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Old 11-01-2010, 02:01 PM   #1
Krakus
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Default Grass Valley ADVCmini and deinterlacing

I've just begun using Grass Valley's new ADVCmini product, which is specifically designed to capture analog video on Macs. I've been capturing some old 8 mm camcorder tapes, and it's done a good job.

Now, I've stumbled across this "single field processing" problem still present in iMovie 11 and would like to try to avoid it. I've read here that it's best to pass the captured video through JES Deinterlacer before editing it in iMovie.

I tried doing just that. I imported the video into iMovie, then opened up the QuickTime MOV that the ADVCmini software creates, inside JES Deinterlacer. But it doesn't appear to be allowing me to deinterlace it! I'm trying to follow the instructions on the "iMovie Output Project" site, but I'm finding that when this MOV file is opened, the Deinterlace option in the Project tab is greyed out. It only allows me to reinterlace it.

When I view the actual video inside iMovie or the QuickTime Player, it does appear to be interlaced, but I'm not an expert. Am I doing something obviously wrong here?

Thanks.
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:47 PM   #2
GrassValley_BH
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What's your intended final output method/format?

The reason I ask is, while deinterlacing the source might make the video look better while editing, if you're outputting to an interlaced output like DVD or TV, then you'll have reduced quality compared to if you had edited the interlaced source.
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Old 11-02-2010, 08:49 PM   #3
Krakus
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My intended output is to burn it to a DVD using iDVD so that I can view the footage on a standard TV. So, yes, indeed my output ought to be interlaced. However, what I have read is that because of this "single field processing" problem in iMovie 09, it will throw out every other horizontal line on export, thus halving the resolution and making the output look rather crappy. Apparently iMovie 08 began to do this to speed up performance, and it's carried over to iMovie 09 and 11. So the workaround apparently is to first de-interlace the video before editing it in iMovie. That's what I'm trying to do. Except I'm not sure how to do it using the MOV format that the ADVCmini produces. I can't seem to de-interlace this particular format.
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Old 11-02-2010, 09:27 PM   #4
GrassValley_BH
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I did some reading on this.

iMovie is essentially designed only for progressive footage, yet many consumers are still outputting to DVD (which is interlaced, except for 24p, but 60i->24p looks like jittery poo), not to mention capturing from non-progressive formats like VHS and 8mm.

Wow, that's really a shame. I guess the Apple mentality is that you must be in the modern age of progressive video. *shrug*

Anyway...
What you'll need to do is deinterlace and convert your 480i60 footage to 480p60 in order to preserve all the incoming information that was captured.

Deinterlacing from 480i60 to 240p30 will lose half the resolution and half the temporal (motion) information.

Deinterlacing from 480i60 to 240p60 will lose half the resolution, but keep all the temporal (motion) information.

Deinterlacing from 480i60 to 480p30 will lose half the resolution and half the temporal (motion) information.

Deinterlacing from 480i60 to 480p60 will keep both the resolution and temporal information.

Problem is, going from 480i60 to 480p60 will double the data size.

Seems like a lot of hoops to jump through just to get iMovie to handle interlaced footage. If you have BootCamp and Windows installed, you might want to check out EDIUS Neo - it handles interlaced and progressive video without unnecessarily throwing information away in the process.
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:14 AM   #5
Chris Punsalan
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Default workflow

Can someone recommend a work flow for getting that 480i60 file to DVD? Ideally using FCP to Compressor then DSP?

Thanks!
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Old 11-21-2010, 04:08 PM   #6
Krakus
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Thanks for looking into it. For now, I've figured out my problem with JES Deinterlacer. I had simply mis-configured my input file as progressive input, not interlaced input. It now allows me to deinterlace the video.
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Old 11-22-2010, 05:47 AM   #7
Chris Punsalan
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Default JES settings

Krakus,

Can you please post what your setting were in JES for proper deinterlacing?

Thanks so much!
Chris
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:17 AM   #8
Krakus
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Well, in order to deinterlace the footage from my DVD (created by my Panasonic DVD recorder) into progressive 60 fps, I used the "both fields" setting in the deinterlace project inside JES Deinterlacer. I also checked adaptive, local, and filter chroma. I also chose to remove jaggies and reduce noise on the input tab. This gave a very good, sharp result. I noticed I also had to check "top field first," or otherwise I would get a strange jitter effect in the video. (Although my understanding was that DV was always bottom field first?).

Just to avoid confusion, my workflow again is... I captured my 8mm analog footage using a Panasonic DVD recorder and burned a DVD. I then used QuickTime Pro to export each VOB to DV format. (Well, the complete story is that QuickTime Pro couldn't open the VOB files on the DVD presumably because of some incompatibility with the Panasonic, so I had to use RipIt to rip the DVD and burn a new one). Anyway, once I had a DV file, I used JES Deinterlacer as above.

If I were to use the ADVCmini-produced QuickTime video file as a source instead, I would simply mark it as interlaced in JES DeInterlacer before proceeding to export it as a deinterlace project.

Problem is, iMovie 11 isn't really designed to handle 60 fps progressive video, and there are apparently lots of additional hoops to jump to make it all work. I've just about given up and will just export 30i to a H.264 video that I can watch on my Apple TV, and forget about DVD's altogether. This should avoid the "single field" problem with iMovie - it only applies to DVD exports.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:29 AM   #9
GrassValley_BH
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Since you came from a DVD, the encoded video was MPEG-2, and for compatibility with some players, most MPEG streams are top/upper field first (even though DVD specs says either should work).

Pretty much only the Consumer DV format uses bottom/lower field first.
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