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Screen Recorder To Work with EDIUS / Variable Frame Rate

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  • Screen Recorder To Work with EDIUS / Variable Frame Rate

    Hi All -

    I recently purchased (the rather expensive) Camtasia screen recorder/editor software as a companion for EDIUS. My plan was to use Camtasia to record software demos, export the files as MP4, and then do final editing and audio sweetening in EDIUS. I chose Camtasia because it's the what the vast majority of the corporate world uses to make screen capture videos. I figured it was "the best" and should work perfectly with EDIUS. I guess I should have known better than to assume anything.

    It turns out that many of these screen recording software packages use VARIABLE FRAME RATE. I've been in TV for 20 years, and had no idea that this was actually a thing until today. Needless to say, EDUIS also doesn't seem to understand that variable frame rate is a thing.

    With all of that background...Can anyone here recommend a screen recording software that is proven to work well with EDIUS? I see a lot of $20 toys on the Internet. But what do the real video professionals use for screen recording? Do any of these things guarantee a fixed frame rate?

  • #2
    Before you go looking for another screen recorder, have you tried transcoding the files you have to HQX using Edius, and using those files in your project?

    Comment


    • #3
      I would use xmedia recode or handbrake (recode is my preferred tool as it has more options) to make a fixed framerate file from them. Edius sould be quite happy then.
      Edius WG 9.55.7303, various 3rd party plugins, VisTitle 2.8.0.5, Win 7 Ultimate SP1, i7-4790K @ 4GHz with HD4600 GPU embedded, MSI Z97 Gaming 7 Motherboard, 32GB Kingston HyperX RAM, nVidia GTX680 4GB GPU, Matrox MX02 Mini MAX, Corsair 750W PSU, Corsair H110i GT Water Cooler, Corsair C70 case, 8TB Internal RAID 0/stripe (2x4TB Seagate SATAIII HDD's, Win7 Software stripe), 1TB Crucial MX500 SSD, Pioneer BDR-207D, Dual 1920x1080 monitors (one on GTX680 and one on Intel HD4600).

      Comment


      • #4
        You have two options with Camtasia.
        1. You can record directly to HQX
        2. You can record with the .trec codec and then export to HQX.

        Personally, I would use the .trec codec. This will offer the most features of the
        Camtasia Program. Capturing directly with 3rd party codecs turns off useful features.
        For one, using HQX doesn't allow the recording of the cursor clicking sounds. If you
        want this in the final product, applying it separately will take a lot of time. I used to record in HQX
        and found it much easier to export to HQX.
        Doing the zooms is also much easier in Camtasia. All of my short video explanations on the forum are captured in .trec.
        I then export to H.264. For my paid Tutorials I use HQX export and edit in Edius. Then that product is uploaded as H.265.

        To record in HQX, click the record to screen option. Go to the Header in the capture panel and click Tools>Option>Record to: .avi.
        Go to the Tools Option Header and select 30 as your frame rate. Then.... Inputs>Video Settings>GV HQX

        To export a .trec recording from Camtasia Go to Share>Local File>Custom Production Settings>Select the AVI Radio Button>Video Compression>HQX>Configure>Superfine>
        Then follow the rest of the pages to the Output File: Name it and save it where you want.

        If you are running Edius X, you will need to have the codec pack installed for 3rd party programs to see the HQX codec.

        I hope this helps.

        Jerry
        Six Gill DV
        www.sgdvtutorials.com
        If you own the Tutorials and you need help, PM me.

        Vistitle YouTube Channel
        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMVlxC8Am4qFbkXJRoPAnMQ/videos

        Windows 10 Pro up to v.1803 Tweaks for Edius Users
        http://sgdvtutorials.com/WIN%2010%20...%20V.2.0.0.pdf


        Main System:: Azrock Z97 Extreme 6, [email protected], 32gb ram, NZXT Z63, Win10 Pro 64, Samsung 850 pro, E7.5/8.5/E9 on separate SSD drives, 2TB Sabrent M.2 NVME, BM MINI MONITOR 4K, 12tb RAID 0 on backplane ,2 BD, Dual LG 27GK65S-B 144Hz monitors, GTX 1080ti SC Black.
        Second System: EditHD Ultimax-i7, X58, [email protected], Corsair H80, Win764, 24gb ram, Storm 3g, Samsung 840 Pro 256, 4tb and 6tb RAID 0 on backplane, GTX 980ti Classified, Edius 9, Apple 30", Samsung 24", dual BD.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jerry View Post
          You have two options with Camtasia.
          1. You can record directly to HQX
          2. You can record with the .trec codec and then export to HQX.
          Hi Jerry,

          Thanks so much for your response.

          I'm not sure that I know what you mean by "record directly to HQX". Are you saying that EDIUS can directly record the screen without additional third party software?

          As for Option 2, Camtasia itself only records Variable Frame Rate in the latest version. Both the .trec and .MP4 formats created by Camtasia seem to be variable frame rate. After Googling around, it seems like prior versions of Camtasia may have supported Constant Frame Rate, but they removed that feature at some point. Maybe you're using an older version of Camtasia?

          Comment


          • #6
            This is the latest word from Camtasia on frame rates. A cynic might believe that Camtasia is more than happy to keep you in their ecosystem and lock out every other full-featured video editor in the market by claiming that variable frame rate is "better" or constant frame rate is "not needed by our users".


            Last Updated December 23, 2020 21:29

            What is Target Capture Frame Rate?

            Target Capture Frame Rate is the highest frame rate in which Camtasia will attempt to capture at. Camtasia captures at a variable frame rate (VFR) and does not capture at a constant frame rate (CFR).
            What is a variable frame rate?

            This is when the frame rate adjusts throughout a recording based on the content being recorded.
            Why does Camtasia capture at a variable frame rate?

            We have found the majority of our users do not need a constant frame rate for their screen recordings.
            Can Camtasia record at 60FPS?

            Yes and no. You can choose 60FPS within the Camtasia settings. Camtasia will do its best to record at the target frame rate you have chosen. However, since we record at a variable frame rate, your recording will never have a constant frame rate of 60 frames per second. Therefore, we will never have a true and constant 60 frame per second recording. This is also true for any other frame rate you may choose.

            Comment


            • #7
              Consider the .trec recording as a temp project. You have to export to something from the actual capture.
              When you export to GV HQX, that exported file will be a constant frame rate.
              I did a test recording straight to HQX and it is also constant.
              Your example is still using .mp4. My exported file was an .avi. Did you try using my instructions to export a GV HQX file?

              Here are the Media Info and Clip Properties panels of an exported HQX file from Camtasia.
              The file shows as 8bit in Media Info but 10bit in Edius X. As far as I can tell, the frame rate is a constant 30fps.
              Whether it is captured as GV HQX or exported from a .trec capture to GV HQX, the frame rate shows as constant in both Edius and Media Info.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by Jerry; 01-30-2021, 06:05 PM.
              Jerry
              Six Gill DV
              www.sgdvtutorials.com
              If you own the Tutorials and you need help, PM me.

              Vistitle YouTube Channel
              https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMVlxC8Am4qFbkXJRoPAnMQ/videos

              Windows 10 Pro up to v.1803 Tweaks for Edius Users
              http://sgdvtutorials.com/WIN%2010%20...%20V.2.0.0.pdf


              Main System:: Azrock Z97 Extreme 6, [email protected], 32gb ram, NZXT Z63, Win10 Pro 64, Samsung 850 pro, E7.5/8.5/E9 on separate SSD drives, 2TB Sabrent M.2 NVME, BM MINI MONITOR 4K, 12tb RAID 0 on backplane ,2 BD, Dual LG 27GK65S-B 144Hz monitors, GTX 1080ti SC Black.
              Second System: EditHD Ultimax-i7, X58, [email protected], Corsair H80, Win764, 24gb ram, Storm 3g, Samsung 840 Pro 256, 4tb and 6tb RAID 0 on backplane, GTX 980ti Classified, Edius 9, Apple 30", Samsung 24", dual BD.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SeanW View Post

                Hi Jerry,

                Thanks so much for your response.

                I'm not sure that I know what you mean by "record directly to HQX". Are you saying that EDIUS can directly record the screen without additional third party software?

                As for Option 2, Camtasia itself only records Variable Frame Rate in the latest version. Both the .trec and .MP4 formats created by Camtasia seem to be variable frame rate. After Googling around, it seems like prior versions of Camtasia may have supported Constant Frame Rate, but they removed that feature at some point. Maybe you're using an older version of Camtasia?
                I don't know of any software (other than Techsmith)
                that uses the .trec natively. An export is required. Choosing the .avi option and selecting GV HQX will give you a constant frame rate.
                Recording directly to GV HQX 30 will give you a constant frame rate of 30p. This exported HQX file can then be imported directly into Edius for editing.

                If all you want to do is capture, there are many cheap or free options.
                Last edited by Jerry; 01-30-2021, 07:01 PM.
                Jerry
                Six Gill DV
                www.sgdvtutorials.com
                If you own the Tutorials and you need help, PM me.

                Vistitle YouTube Channel
                https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMVlxC8Am4qFbkXJRoPAnMQ/videos

                Windows 10 Pro up to v.1803 Tweaks for Edius Users
                http://sgdvtutorials.com/WIN%2010%20...%20V.2.0.0.pdf


                Main System:: Azrock Z97 Extreme 6, [email protected], 32gb ram, NZXT Z63, Win10 Pro 64, Samsung 850 pro, E7.5/8.5/E9 on separate SSD drives, 2TB Sabrent M.2 NVME, BM MINI MONITOR 4K, 12tb RAID 0 on backplane ,2 BD, Dual LG 27GK65S-B 144Hz monitors, GTX 1080ti SC Black.
                Second System: EditHD Ultimax-i7, X58, [email protected], Corsair H80, Win764, 24gb ram, Storm 3g, Samsung 840 Pro 256, 4tb and 6tb RAID 0 on backplane, GTX 980ti Classified, Edius 9, Apple 30", Samsung 24", dual BD.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Now that I think about it...

                  I guess I actually used the Camtasia "SnagIt" feature to make the screen recording (which I'm certain can only export MP4 and tsrec). But perhaps I didn't actually place that raw footage on the Camtasia timeline and do a complete project render and export. I'll try that and report back. Thanks again for your help and making me think twice!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have used Camtasia many times and have not had any problems. As Jerry said, I export the file after capture. I honestly have not checked the bitrate as I have not had any problems.
                    1: 3970X Threadripper, Asus ROG Strix TR40 E Gaming, G. Skill Trident Z Neo 128G DDR4 3600, EVGA GeForce RTX 2080Ti, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 1T, Intel 660P M.2 2T (2), Seagate Ironwolf NAS 12T, Enermax TR4 360 AIO, Lian Li 011 DXL, AJA Kona 4, Asus ROG Thor 1200

                    2: i7 6950X OC to 4.5GHz, ASUS RAMPAGE V EDITION 10, Corsair Dominator Platinum 64G DDR4 2800, SAMSUNG 950 PRO M.2 512G, GeForce GTX 1080ti SC Black, Corsair AX1200i, Phanteks Luxe, 16T RAID HGST Deskstar NAS 4T, Corsair H115i AIO, BM IP 4K

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OK, thanks for the info GrassValley_PS.

                      It's not actually the bitrate that is the issue, it's the frame rate. Most of these screen capture programs, including Camtasia, capture the screen using a variable frame rate which none of the traditional video editing packages can handle correctly. Personally, I didn't even know variable frame rate was a thing until last week. But apparently variable frame rate is quite common in the gaming community and the world of screen capture.

                      I do think that it is important to have a known frame rate for screen capture. In my opinion, it should match the native frame rate of any other traditional video to be included in the project. I don't think anybody needs or wants "film-like" 3:2 pulldown in their computer screen captures :)

                      Last edited by SeanW; 01-30-2021, 10:07 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SeanW View Post
                        Now that I think about it...

                        I guess I actually used the Camtasia "SnagIt" feature to make the screen recording (which I'm certain can only export MP4 and tsrec). But perhaps I didn't actually place that raw footage on the Camtasia timeline and do a complete project render and export. I'll try that and report back. Thanks again for your help and making me think twice!
                        What you do is:
                        1. Capture the screen
                        2. The captured file will be loaded onto the Camtasia timeline automatically
                        3. Here you can do either a full edit or a rough edit. This is when I would recommend adding your camera moves to the video.
                        4. After this is completed, export to .avi HQX and you will have your constant frame rate.
                        Jerry
                        Six Gill DV
                        www.sgdvtutorials.com
                        If you own the Tutorials and you need help, PM me.

                        Vistitle YouTube Channel
                        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMVlxC8Am4qFbkXJRoPAnMQ/videos

                        Windows 10 Pro up to v.1803 Tweaks for Edius Users
                        http://sgdvtutorials.com/WIN%2010%20...%20V.2.0.0.pdf


                        Main System:: Azrock Z97 Extreme 6, [email protected], 32gb ram, NZXT Z63, Win10 Pro 64, Samsung 850 pro, E7.5/8.5/E9 on separate SSD drives, 2TB Sabrent M.2 NVME, BM MINI MONITOR 4K, 12tb RAID 0 on backplane ,2 BD, Dual LG 27GK65S-B 144Hz monitors, GTX 1080ti SC Black.
                        Second System: EditHD Ultimax-i7, X58, [email protected], Corsair H80, Win764, 24gb ram, Storm 3g, Samsung 840 Pro 256, 4tb and 6tb RAID 0 on backplane, GTX 980ti Classified, Edius 9, Apple 30", Samsung 24", dual BD.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SeanW View Post
                          OK, thanks for the info GrassValley_PS.

                          It's not actually the bitrate that is the issue, it's the frame rate. Most of these screen capture programs, including Camtasia, capture the screen using a variable frame rate which none of the traditional video editing packages can handle correctly. Personally, I didn't even know variable frame rate was a thing until last week. But apparently variable frame rate is quite common in the gaming community and the world of screen capture.

                          I do think that it is important to have a known frame rate for screen capture. In my opinion, it should match the native frame rate of any other traditional video to be included in the project. I don't think anybody needs or wants "film-like" 3:2 pulldown in their computer screen captures :)
                          If all you are doing is uploading to social media, the variable frame rate won't make a big difference. The file is more than likely going to be re-encoded before airing.
                          Since you want to edit the video in Edius, exporting to .avi GV HQX is going to be the only way to go about getting
                          a constant frame rate for ease of use within Edius.
                          Don't overthink the process.

                          Here is a link to a ton of Camtasia tutorials:
                          https://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-camtasia.html
                          Jerry
                          Six Gill DV
                          www.sgdvtutorials.com
                          If you own the Tutorials and you need help, PM me.

                          Vistitle YouTube Channel
                          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMVlxC8Am4qFbkXJRoPAnMQ/videos

                          Windows 10 Pro up to v.1803 Tweaks for Edius Users
                          http://sgdvtutorials.com/WIN%2010%20...%20V.2.0.0.pdf


                          Main System:: Azrock Z97 Extreme 6, [email protected], 32gb ram, NZXT Z63, Win10 Pro 64, Samsung 850 pro, E7.5/8.5/E9 on separate SSD drives, 2TB Sabrent M.2 NVME, BM MINI MONITOR 4K, 12tb RAID 0 on backplane ,2 BD, Dual LG 27GK65S-B 144Hz monitors, GTX 1080ti SC Black.
                          Second System: EditHD Ultimax-i7, X58, [email protected], Corsair H80, Win764, 24gb ram, Storm 3g, Samsung 840 Pro 256, 4tb and 6tb RAID 0 on backplane, GTX 980ti Classified, Edius 9, Apple 30", Samsung 24", dual BD.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SeanW View Post
                            OK, thanks for the info GrassValley_PS.

                            It's not actually the bitrate that is the issue, it's the frame rate. Most of these screen capture programs, including Camtasia, capture the screen using a variable frame rate which none of the traditional video editing packages can handle correctly. Personally, I didn't even know variable frame rate was a thing until last week. But apparently variable frame rate is quite common in the gaming community and the world of screen capture.
                            Sorry, I meant to say frame rate. I guess I am usually discussing bit rates CBR or VBR and my fingers just typed that.
                            1: 3970X Threadripper, Asus ROG Strix TR40 E Gaming, G. Skill Trident Z Neo 128G DDR4 3600, EVGA GeForce RTX 2080Ti, Samsung 970 EVO M.2 1T, Intel 660P M.2 2T (2), Seagate Ironwolf NAS 12T, Enermax TR4 360 AIO, Lian Li 011 DXL, AJA Kona 4, Asus ROG Thor 1200

                            2: i7 6950X OC to 4.5GHz, ASUS RAMPAGE V EDITION 10, Corsair Dominator Platinum 64G DDR4 2800, SAMSUNG 950 PRO M.2 512G, GeForce GTX 1080ti SC Black, Corsair AX1200i, Phanteks Luxe, 16T RAID HGST Deskstar NAS 4T, Corsair H115i AIO, BM IP 4K

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For future Internet searchers and other lurkers interested in this topic, here are my final conclusions:

                              1) Camtasia will indeed render and export to constant frame rate (as Jerry originally suggested). The Snag-It utility won't do it, but full-blown Camtasia will. As Jerry said, you must render to AVI not MP4. (The Internet claims that the AVI file format itself doesn't have any mechanism to support variable frame rate. So I guess a render to AVI should be fool-proof & certain to produce a fixed frame rate!!)

                              2) The fixed frame rate produced by Camtasia seems to be integer only (i.e. 15, 25, 30, 50, 60). I don't see any support for 29.97, 59.94, 23.46, etc. This might matter to you if you want to mix traditional video into your project and don't want any sneaky frame rate conversion happening behind your back. I suspect integer frame rates will also be problematic if you're trying to sync into long audio narration segments recorded on a 29.97 or 59.94 camera.

                              3) At the end of the day, I found a utility called "Bandicam" which was developed for the gaming industry, but is pretty much a perfect companion for EDIUS wrt. screen capture. It's a straight forward, inexpensive tool with a couple of really important features:

                              a) Ability to force a constant frame rate

                              b) Support for integer and non-integer frame rates

                              c) Lots of choices for intra-frame codecs, including MJPEG

                              d) GPU accelerated encoding to H.264 and H.265 (basically no CPU load during screen capture encoding, works extremely well). That might matter to you if you're trying to record the screen while also trying to demo a CPU intensive app (in my case, the screen capture and the software I'm trying to demo both compete for CPU resources).

                              e) Very explicit tech support and guidance on how to configure the product to work with traditional video editors.

                              Thanks everyone for the thoughts and insight!

                              Comment

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