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  • OS as a limitating factor

    Interesting article about the OS being a limitating factor when using multi core CPUs:

    http://news.com.com/8301-10784_3-9722524-7.html

    From the article:

    Windows Vista, on the other hand, is "designed to run on 1, 2, maybe 4 processors,"

    He actually means four cores, German sources noted. And they pointed out that XP has even more problems with multi core CPUs.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Zorro View Post
    Interesting article about the OS being a limitating factor when using multi core CPUs:

    http://news.com.com/8301-10784_3-9722524-7.html

    From the article:

    Windows Vista, on the other hand, is "designed to run on 1, 2, maybe 4 processors,"

    He actually means four cores, German sources noted. And they pointed out that XP has even more problems with multi core CPUs.
    This is just not true…
    It’s not the OS limitation; it is the license you have purchased that is limiting you to 2 processors on a computer. You can have 20 processors in a box and if you only purchased basic version of the operating system it will only recognize the first 2 processors. When working with ‘server’ operating systems you can purchase up to 8 processors license at a time, but when it comes to XP you need to purchase OEM versions of XP for each 2 processors you have in the box.

    This is nothing new. If you look at EULA for each operating system (going back to Win95 and on) you will see that clause. If you are on XP box right now, take a look in your “C: \Windows\System32\eula.txt”. Look for section “1.1 Installation and use”

    On the other hand, you need to understand that the software you are running has to be written with multi-processor architecture in mind to take advantage of extra hardware. So just having extra processors does nothing.
    Rob

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    • #3
      I think people are misconstruing those comments.

      Those operating systems don't have trouble running on more than two or so cores, they have trouble taking full advantage of them. Many of the operations in the OS cannot be broken down into smaller pieces that can efficiently execute in parallel.

      Since most of the CPU load will be in applications and not the OS, I don't think that's a big deal. Versions of Windows based on the NT kernel have been able to take advantage of multiple CPUs for many years, the Data Center edition of Windows 2000 for example supported 32 processors.

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      • #4
        Rob,

        This is just not true…
        the Microsoft guy is speaking about thread handling and scheduling. There need to be improvements.

        Comment


        • #5
          There is always room for improvement…
          But to say:

          Originally posted by Zorro View Post
          Windows Vista, on the other hand, is "designed to run on 1, 2, maybe 4 processors,"

          He actually means four cores, German sources noted. And they pointed out that XP has even more problems with multi core CPUs.
          In not true.
          Rob

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          • #6
            In fact, this interview is filling hundreds of pages here in Europe's (online) tech magazines. Since a Core today is nearly a full-fledged CPU (compared to HT technology) the equation is correct when talking about the Home/Pro packages of XP and Vista.

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