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  • biopic
    replied
    Originally posted by Lemi View Post
    I always first edit the parts I find more interesting, then finish the other ones...
    I think that's more to do with human nature, than specifically about editing!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by Lemi View Post
    Perhaps it's a little OT, but I was always wondering is it better to learn the A/B editing and THEN switch to NLE, or simply, it doesn't really matter.

    Sometimes I think my logic of editing is wrong, since I always first edit the parts I find more interesting, then finish the other ones...
    No one can tell you the wright or wrong way. It is your choice. All that is just techno-babble any way. It all comes down to the composition of the shots(a good editor can fix these sometimes), the timing of the project, and the overall quality of the finished product. These things are many times overlooked just to slap pretty pictures together. Hey, we are all guilty of this. On those points constructive criticism will help you.

    If it takes you longer to do the project than your neighbor, oh well.
    It is your work flow that determines your final outcome.
    A/B or single line editing depends on the needs of the project and what you are used too.
    After moving to a single line work flow, I doubt seriously that I could go back.

    As I said, learn both methods and decide what fits you the best.

    I can say that in the 'old' days of linear editing, more shots were planned and all the edits were pretty much scripted and thought out before hand. Saves time and money. This was due to the linear work flow.
    Now days, we can try different flow, effects and audio ques. In most cases being able to get a better product in the end.

    It was not long ago that Premiere was A/B and Rex/Storm Edit was elementary single line. You could add an insert line, if I remember correctly, and that was all.
    We forget how easy things have become in the last 5 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • redgum
    replied
    A/B editing was a transition process between lineal editing and non-lineal editing and I'm sure it won't reappear in future NLE's. I would think it logical to move on to single line editing particularly if you do it commercially.
    But every editor has his or her style and the beauty is you still have a choice at the moment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lemi
    replied
    Perhaps it's a little OT, but I was always wondering is it better to learn the A/B editing and THEN switch to NLE, or simply, it doesn't really matter.

    Sometimes I think my logic of editing is wrong, since I always first edit the parts I find more interesting, then finish the other ones...

    Leave a comment:


  • PaulTV
    replied
    yeah, the last linear suite I built in London was based on D1, D2, Digibetacam and cost a cool half million pounds Sterling - ouch

    Paul

    Leave a comment:


  • redgum
    replied
    Unless you take into account the Quad 2" format and "c" 1" format or Betacam or Betacam SP or 3/4" UMatic or 3/4" BVU or VHS or Betamax. You needed a machine for each format and timebase correctors and expensive vision switches and camera control units then you would look at audio and mix to 32 channel deck and if you wanted more than a dozen special effects you bought a Quantel for $1.2m. And in the end the quality of the video was very ordinary.
    Some people don't know how lucky they are now!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by redgum View Post
    The easiest way to describe this is by comparing with the old system of editing with two tape machines.
    In those days you would edit by cutting the first shot then adding the second and so on until the edit was finished. You didn't have the ability to move shots along a timeline. This is called lineal editing.
    With an NLE you can of course edit the last part of your program before the begining part and move back and forth along that timeline. You are able to add or delete scenes at any time in the edit without leaving gaps or time spaces. This is called non-lineal editing NLE.
    Under the older system (tape editing) if you wanted to change a scene in the middle of your program you would need to copy the edited master to the edit point, insert or remove your scene and then copy the end of your edit to the new master. You would lose picture quality in this process.
    Adding one thing to that, it actualy became an art form of its own. Trying to sync up the 2 decks, flying erase heads just coming on line, and tape stretch were all issues that had to be handled. Upside, you only had two formats. NTSC, PAL-SECAM. You only had 2 different resolutions. NTSC and PAL. Pretty simple then.
    Now you have to learn, and be proficient, to use the variations that are available for the diverse world of digital.
    The ease of putting videos together also has put editing into the hands of everyone. On the other hand, just putting a video together does not necessarily make you an editor.

    Leave a comment:


  • redgum
    replied
    The easiest way to describe this is by comparing with the old system of editing with two tape machines.
    In those days you would edit by cutting the first shot then adding the second and so on until the edit was finished. You didn't have the ability to move shots along a timeline. This is called lineal editing.
    With an NLE you can of course edit the last part of your program before the begining part and move back and forth along that timeline. You are able to add or delete scenes at any time in the edit without leaving gaps or time spaces. This is called non-lineal editing NLE.
    Under the older system (tape editing) if you wanted to change a scene in the middle of your program you would need to copy the edited master to the edit point, insert or remove your scene and then copy the end of your edit to the new master. You would lose picture quality in this process.

    Leave a comment:


  • haitham786
    started a topic Non linear software

    Non linear software

    Canopus Edius is known as non-linear editing software. What is exactly meant by non-linear software?
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