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  • Slow down to a stop effect

    Does anyone know if it's possible with video/audio footage to create the effect of slowing down to a stop such as might happen if a film projector loses power (or with a vinyl record on a turntable)?

  • #2
    Copy the clip to a lower track, then Time Remap to "stretch" the tail-end to a longer time-period.

    You'll have to fiddle a little (and put the original-speed cut clip above the Time Remap-ed version) to get the start of the slowdown to match up with the normal-speed section, but it's do-able.

    Essentially you'll want to play increasing amounts of source (top) in larger time.

    So your Time Remap keyframes might look like:

    vvvvvvvvvv
    [FONT=Fixedsys]*--------[/FONT][FONT=Fixedsys]*-*-*-*-*-*
    **--*---*----*-----*
    [/FONT]
    You're time-compressing the beginning part of the clip (the v-ed part) to play within the first frame of the result. This is the part you want to cover with the normal-speed clip.[FONT=Fixedsys]
    [/FONT]

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    • #3
      Thanks Brandon, I'll try it later today after work.
      Regards,
      Don

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      • #4
        Good Old Speedcontrol did this. Still works on SD but probably not on HD.
        Peter
        Skanoer, Sweden

        Edius Pro 8, Imaginate 2, Intel i7 950 , 12GB DDR3, 5 TB, Windows Pro 10 Creative, 64bit, Encore CS5

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GrassValley_BH View Post
          Copy the clip to a lower track, then Time Remap to "stretch" the tail-end to a longer time-period.

          You'll have to fiddle a little (and put the original-speed cut clip above the Time Remap-ed version) to get the start of the slowdown to match up with the normal-speed section, but it's do-able.

          Essentially you'll want to play increasing amounts of source (top) in larger time.

          So your Time Remap keyframes might look like:

          vvvvvvvvvv
          [FONT=Fixedsys]*--------[/FONT][FONT=Fixedsys]*-*-*-*-*-*
          **--*---*----*-----*
          [/FONT]
          You're time-compressing the beginning part of the clip (the v-ed part) to play within the first frame of the result. This is the part you want to cover with the normal-speed clip.[FONT=Fixedsys]
          [/FONT]
          Hey Brandon, it was quite easy to simply cut the clip where I wanted it to slow and simply apply your formula to it - fantastic mate!

          Comment


          • #6
            Great! I'd love to see what you've done if it's something that can be viewed by others.

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            • #7
              G'day Brandon, I did a test from a very small section of a local TV show just to see if it works but the trouble is that I'm a 71 year old amateur who doesn't know how to put it up on this site. I'm happy to do it if you can help me.
              Regards,
              Don

              Comment


              • #8
                And I thought I was the only fully grown-up person around here.
                Fred D
                Win 7 Pro-64 bit, EDIUS Workgroup 8.5, Intel Ivy Bridge i5, ASUS P8Z77-V-LK, 8GB Kningston DDR3, Pioneer BDR-209UBK, EVGA NVIDEA GEForce GT630, Corsair TX750M 750w Power Supply, 4 WD Black HDD for 3.15TB, ACEDVIO, Spark HD, eSATA controller, ANTEC 300 case.

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                • #9
                  The easiest (though slowest) way is to upload an MPEG version to a site like YouTube or Vimeo. They'll have to recompress it for web viewing anyway. You may need to shorten the length as there's an upload filesize limit.

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