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What's it rendering exactly?

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  • What's it rendering exactly?

    When I finish my weddings edit in SD I render entire project loaded area before printing to file for DVD. I'm not sure why I do this as there is usually just simple filters and transitions which I can view in real time. Edius then spends about 20mins rendering.

    Not a big problem but what is it doing all that time and is it necessary to do it if it plays back real time anyway?
    Barry Weare
    BW Videofilms, Berkshire UK
    --------
    Edius 5.5, Win7 Pro 64bit, 16GB RAM, Intel Core i7 2.8GHz, NVIDIA GeForce9600GT, 5x 1TB SATA II (24/7 WD Enterprise type) with 4x in Raid1 for video, 1x for system/utilities.

  • #2
    It is not necessary to render before printing to file!
    Aristotelis Bafaloukos
    Systems Engineer, Video Editor, 3D Artist
    BEng (Hons), MSc, MBCS

    Ctrl+Alt+Delete

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    • #3
      Thanks, but when is it necessary then?
      Barry Weare
      BW Videofilms, Berkshire UK
      --------
      Edius 5.5, Win7 Pro 64bit, 16GB RAM, Intel Core i7 2.8GHz, NVIDIA GeForce9600GT, 5x 1TB SATA II (24/7 WD Enterprise type) with 4x in Raid1 for video, 1x for system/utilities.

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      • #4
        It is necessary only if you want to preview an area that your system cannot play in RT...

        Also it is a good idea to render the loaded areas before printing to tape...
        Aristotelis Bafaloukos
        Systems Engineer, Video Editor, 3D Artist
        BEng (Hons), MSc, MBCS

        Ctrl+Alt+Delete

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        • #5
          Hello Barry
          Also I had an issue the other day printing to file in edius broadcast ver 4.61 so I went back in and rendered all the loaded timeline and all of a sudden it printed to file ok
          So if you want to be 100% sure your timeline is ok irrespective of realtime playing then render your timeline.But as said before you dont need to.
          Good luck
          Edius Version 7.4.Win 7 pro
          -Dual Xeon i7 2.66 Ghz x 5550quadcore NehalemHyper/Threading.SupermicroX8DAI motherboard. 1xwestern dig 32mb cache drive.2x 1tb samsung 32mb cache sata drives. 6x 2GB DDR3 ECC RAM.nVidia-gtx 760 card.Procoder3,Prodad,New Blue,Blufftitler After Effects,cinemasuite etc.

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          • #6
            Barry.....

            Ditto here, Barry. Especially in HD. Tried to Procoder 3 to Blu-Ray, and forgot to render. Procoder would not accept the timeline. Rendered - then everything was AOK. Maybe somewhere it says we don't have to, but........
            Cheers,
            Alan
            Alan J. Levi
            Director

            SYSTEM: ASUS P8Z77-VPro mobo, Intel 3770K CPU, 16 Gig Crucial 1866 RAM, Antec 1000W PS, EVGA nVidia 560Ti 1Gig Video, CoolerMaster CPU cooler, LG GGW-H20L BluRay DVD, SPARK card w/23" Samsung 1920x1080 Monitor, OCZ 240GB SSD boot in Swapable Tray & 3 WD Enterprise 1TB video RAID 5 HDD's. 4.5TB RAID 1 Outboard backups, Behringer2000 Audio Fader/Controller

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            • #7
              At some point the timeline has to be rendered irrespective of where it goes (file or tape).

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              • #8
                You should not have to render the timeline before printing to file, of course you would need to if printing to tape.

                I have never had procoder not take a timeline but to be honest I am not editing as much anymore.

                Tell me what happens when Procoder rejects the timeline.


                Mike

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                • #9
                  Hello Mike, the term "rendering" has always been used for the merging of two images, for whatever purpose, to create a single image. Wikipedia describes the process as "'Rendering' is also used to describe the process of calculating effects in a video editing file to produce final video output."
                  Edius has realtime preview but whatever else happens, seen or unseen, the final product, file or tape, must be rendered.

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                  • #10
                    when printing to file...mpeg for example the rendering is done while encoding...
                    in general it is not necessary to render anything before printing to file...
                    Aristotelis Bafaloukos
                    Systems Engineer, Video Editor, 3D Artist
                    BEng (Hons), MSc, MBCS

                    Ctrl+Alt+Delete

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by redgum View Post
                      Hello Mike, the term "rendering" has always been used for the merging of two images, for whatever purpose, to create a single image. Wikipedia describes the process as "'Rendering' is also used to describe the process of calculating effects in a video editing file to produce final video output."
                      Edius has realtime preview but whatever else happens, seen or unseen, the final product, file or tape, must be rendered.

                      Were you pointing this at me? :)


                      The realtime output is full res and full frame. So, you would not have to render while going to tape if the project plays on the timeline with no dropped frames.

                      The only time that you should have to "render" anything on the timeline is when there is an overloaded area on the timeline that will stagger playback. Then that area would need to be rendered before going to tape.

                      As far as going to a file?

                      Encoding is about the same as rendering but a little different. It is combining all of the effects and layers just like a render would but it is also conforming it to specified file type for use somewhere else.

                      If you rendered the entire timeline into a single file you have actually just encoded your project into that file type.

                      When you render the entire project you are usually having EDIUS look to all of the yellow and red areas and it is creating temp files of each area in a rendered folder under the project folder.

                      This would not be encoding as it is not a single file that can be played back of the entire timeline.

                      So, now that I have confused everyone back to your normal programming :)
                      Mike

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                      • #12
                        Mike is right. There is no need to render at all, you can even "delete rendered files" before printing to file. When there is a heavy area on the timeline, encoding to MPEG2 (or whatever your output is) will take a bit longer because it is doing alot of processes during that time.

                        Now printing to DV tape (for example) if you have areas where there are dropped frames, you should set an in and out in that area, then render so you can smoothly print back to tape.

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                        • #13
                          I don't want to labour the point but ALL NLE's render. Rendering is the act of merging two files of the same vintage (say AVI). Encoding is the act of changing a file from one format (say AVI) to another (say Mpeg).
                          Stormdave, of course you can remove the render files. All that means is that when creating a new file the merged points or effects need to be rendered again. That why you say the processing (render) will take a bit longer.
                          Mike, the output of full res or full frame as you describe has nothing to do with the render process but is simply good management of the processing power. That's why lesser machines have difficulty.
                          Just remember that whilst Edius handles full frame, full res well and is reasonable quick with rendering this is because compared to other NLE's it handles so few plug-ins or foreign files and to some that may be a positive.

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                          • #14
                            I will agree with you on the 3rd party stuff but it handles more file types than most.

                            To put a more defined explanation on what we do.

                            We render everything. Whenever a clip ha anything done to it like adding a filter, transition, or keyer or it is the wrong output format it HAS to be rendered.

                            Now, we do it so well that most of the time you will never see it happen. We do it on the fly and that is why you see so much realtime output. There is rendering going on but it is being done on the fly.

                            It is only when the load gets to much for the CPU to handle that you get the stuttering or the dropped frame dialog window (depending on your settings).

                            That is when you need to actually go to the menus and ask to render.


                            Mike

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                            • #15
                              Thank you Mike, that's a good explanation. :-)

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