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  • MP3 sounds distortion

    I just started editing in Edius 4.6 (HDV project).

    I have added a song in mp3 format that sounds fine from it's source file, but when I add it to the timeline the beginning is a bit distorted, but then clears up.

    Anyone have an idea about this one?
    Motion Art Cinematography

    Windows 10 Home 64 bit, Intel I7 4.2ghz, 32GB Ram, Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070

    Gold Coast, Australia

  • #2
    Hmm, converted to Wav and sounds fine, just don't know why that would happen.
    Motion Art Cinematography

    Windows 10 Home 64 bit, Intel I7 4.2ghz, 32GB Ram, Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070

    Gold Coast, Australia

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    • #3
      most mp3 files especially variable bitrate ones I tried are bad quality and cause artefacts in a 48k project

      so I convert the 44.1k mp3's to wav 48k using the Easy CD Extractor File cnverter from poikosoft.com

      it allows you to copy an entire music CD to hard disk and 48k wav in 5 minutes

      remember, video is 48k, CD audio is 44.1 and most mp3 are 44.1 or less
      Anton Strauss
      Antons Video Productions - Sydney

      EDIUS X WG with BM Mini Monitor 4k and BM Mini Recorder, Gigabyte X299 UD4 Pro, Intel Core i9 9960X 16 Core, 32 Threads @ 4.3Ghz, Corsair Water Cooling, Gigabyte RTX-2070 Super 3X 8GB Video Card, Samsung 860 Pro 512GB SSD for System, 8TB Samsung Raid0 SSD for Video, 2 Pioneer BDR-209 Blu-ray/DVD burners, Hotswap Bay for 3.5" Sata and 2.5" SSD, Phanteks Enthoo Pro XL Tower, Corsair 32GB DDR4 Ram, Win10 Pro 21H2

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      • #4
        MP3 is a video file, but with the video removed, so you end up with an audio file which often has corrupted headers and leads to editing problems.
        Stick to using wav and you'll be fine.
        www.myvideoproblems.com
        Microsoft MVP in Digital Media

        Edius 4.61, NX Express, xp sp2

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        • #5
          Always stick to 48K or you may get drift over the timeline!
          Supermicro X6DAE-G2 - 2x Dual Core Xeon 3.2 Ghz, 4G ram, SP Breakout Box, Nvidia GTX260, win xp pro. CS4. Mackie HR824 audio monitoring, Audient ASP510 Surround Sound Controller + smaller bits..

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skier-hughes View Post
            MP3 is a video file, but with the video removed, so you end up with an audio file which often has corrupted headers and leads to editing problems.
            Stick to using wav and you'll be fine.
            MP3 is a lossy audio format, not a video format

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            • #7
              Correct.

              We're (Thomson) part of the original engineering of MPEG-1 Audio Layer 3 and practically own the license for it. :)

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              • #8
                My bad understanding of previously read material.

                Though reading through links from Stormdaves link I came across this little snippet....

                Sisvel S.p.A. and its U.S. subsidiary Audio MPEG, Inc. previously sued Thomson for patent infringement on MP3 technology

                Ooops.

                Why is MP3 such a blighter to edit then? Is it jsut the vast array of encoders and not suitable decoders at the other end?
                www.myvideoproblems.com
                Microsoft MVP in Digital Media

                Edius 4.61, NX Express, xp sp2

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                • #9
                  MP3 is compressed audio, like MPEG-2 is compressed video..

                  While to a user, the decoding might seem trivial on a computation level, the work still has to be done. At the same time as decoding video and then hoping it all goes out in sync.

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                  • #10
                    I always convert to wav, and with todays fast internet / ftp's etc. it's easier to move moderate wav files arround.

                    /Ulf
                    Best regards * Ulf * Denmark
                    mail to me
                    Main system: i7 3930K, 3.2 GHz @ 4.3 GHz, 32 GB RAM , 2 x WD 1TB Raid 0, 2 x 1 TB HDD, 1 x SSD boot, Nvidia GFX 570, Win 7 64.
                    Second system: i7 970, 3.2 GHz, 24 GB RAM, Asus P6T, Samsung 840 Pro 120 GB systemdrive, 4 x WD 1TB in raid 5, 1 WD 500 GB for exports, Asus GTX 460 Win 7 64.
                    Third system: Dell Precision M4600, i7 3.2 GHz, 16 GB RAM, Nvidia Quadro 2GB, 2 x SSD, win 7 64 Pro.

                    Edius 7.01 & 6.54 & - VisTitle 2

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                    • #11
                      The root issue is simply this...

                      Editing involves a successive number of video or audio frames.
                      Playback is instead the decoding of a continual stream.


                      While at first glance they appear to be the same, you can think of it this way...

                      If you're walking a path from point A to point B, taking pictures.

                      In editing, you're quickly instructing the person to get from their exact location to a specific point on the path, then to take a pciture. The person's location is absolute as it involves a known start point followed by relative movement.

                      In playback, the person is on the path and you're just instructing them where to go relative from where they currently are and take a picture. We don't know or care exactly where the person is, just where they are relative to the next point.


                      There's a subtle, but important difference. In both cases the person has pictures from point A to point B, but in the case where each picture can be taken individually, the person is always at a known position.

                      In the case of intra-frame vs inter-frame encoded data, when using inter-frame encoded data (i.e. MPEG-2 Long-GOP), in editing there's some amount of work that must be done to "figure out where you are" before you can give the instructions to get to the correct point on the path.

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