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720p VS 1080i

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  • tingsern
    replied
    HVX wins? Wait till you test the HPX172 - 1,000 times better than HVX202 :-). I already swapped my HVX202 for the HPX172 ... very happy with this one - and is 1kg lighter.

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  • mattmatt
    replied
    I love the fact that I can have a 720, 50 over 25p project (for smooth slo-mo) in Edius.

    What "Looks" better, in terms of detail and sharpness? That depends >

    1080i shot on z1 v.s. 720p shot on HVX......the HVX wins. Its not just the format to consider here.....its where it came from. Which glass was used, what compression algorithms and what sensor size captured it.

    Edius handles 720p and 1080i equally as well, so basically - whatever the camera captured, I would edit with that format. But if you are considering buying a camera based on a format - I would definitely go 720p instead of 1080i.

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  • GrassValley_KH
    replied
    Ok, time to wrap this one up - there's no apparent relevance to EDIUS here.

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  • Blast1
    replied
    Interlace will be dead in two years.......it is a CRT necessary evil!
    Interlacing is necessary to meet the broadcast transport stream channel requirements

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  • SoundFreak
    replied
    Originally posted by AJ101 View Post
    Interlace will be dead in two years.......
    On the production side maybe, delivery surely not in several Asian countries.

    Here where I live, the CRT TV is still king, and will be for quite a while, but that's more of an price issue as volume of sales are low for LCD & Plasma TV and are almost all i units.

    Therefore the i will rule the p for a while more............

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  • AJ101
    replied
    Interlace will be dead in two years.......it is a CRT necessary evil!

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  • peterC
    replied
    Originally posted by Bluetongue View Post
    Thanks everybody there is obviously a big difference between a FULL Progressive camera and one that has Fsp Quasi Progressive.
    Next time! when ever that is
    Regards Barry
    Buying any sort of gear right now is a real tech nightmare. These are very rapidly changing and expensive times at any level.

    A myriad of formats, codecs, etc going in all directions.

    It is horses for courses, but some sound basics are the right start to assess your needs. Hard if you are not too techy and still, if you are.

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  • Bluetongue
    replied
    Thanks everybody there is obviously a big difference between a FULL Progressive camera and one that has Fsp Quasi Progressive.
    Next time! when ever that is
    Regards Barry

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  • tingsern
    replied
    I shot exclusively on 720p on HVX202. I found the camera delivers a very smooth video that is perfectly acceptable to my clients. No difference could be seen at 1080i (or p) for HVX202. If you use a much higher end camera - yes - there will be a difference - but, since I am talking of only HVX202, 720p is more than adequate.

    As a matter of interest for all HVX200/HVX202 owners ... 1080i is NOT what the camera captures ... it is really 1080p. And then it takes 2 1080p fields and chops half of that - giving you 1080i. Hence 720p is a better bet for HVX202. Not 1080i.

    As for shutter speeds, the minimum shutter I would use is 1/25 second (PAL). At extremely low lighting, that is what I set the camera to - especially inside monasteries (using natural lighting and nothing else). It produces an image that is very good (after running it through NEAT VIDEO noise reduction), especially, at maximum GAIN of +12dB.

    If there is enough light, I set the shutter to 1/60 minimum (or even 1/250) - then all the motion captured will be perfect - no jitters.

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  • Bassman
    replied
    Originally posted by Bluetongue View Post
    With 720 or 1080 Progressive how much jitter on movement do you get.
    The amount of jitter is related to the framerate you choose to shoot the 720 or 1080p footage with.

    If you choose 60 frames a second, it will be butter smooth.

    24 frames a second will show more frame movement, especially on pans.

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  • THoff
    replied
    True progressive cameras don't have those issues, they capture the entire frame at once, and if you process it correctly, it will display that way too.

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  • Bluetongue
    replied
    Hi everyone
    I have been reading this thread with some interest and I have a couple of questions
    With 720 or 1080 Progressive how much jitter on movement do you get.
    All my cameras have Fsp (Field sliced Progressive) and the resulting video all look as though the frame rate is around 12.5 frames per second but when the cursor is moved on the timeline frame by frame it is 25fps? and any movement even people walking is jittery and this I find unacceptable for my style of filming
    Do full Progressive cameras display this or is it only those with Fsp?
    My reason for asking this is I have some super 8 video (Film) that runs at 18fps and it does not jitter?
    Sorry to open another can of worms but those who use progressive are convinced it is better and vise versa, perhaps it is a case of horses for courses?
    Regards Barry

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  • rando
    replied
    Thanks everyone!

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  • rando
    replied
    To sum up in very technical terms. There close enough for wedding work:) Thanks I see no reason for me to pursue 1080i cameras until these are ready to be retired.

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  • witchdoctor
    replied
    Rando - the responses from Tingsern and StormDave allude to the real answer, which is that it depends on the equipment, both recording and viewing. I have the HVX-200, and have done many tests to decide whether to use the 720p or 1080i modes. There is a very subtle increase in resolution at 1080i compared to 720p, but I too have chosen to do everything in 720p because it seems to yield better frame-to-frame viewing, which I use in sports and occasionally in wedding recordings. Especially when going to DVD, I would stongly advise the use of 720p.

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