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is there any Difference between dv quality ?

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  • james
    replied
    slam alaykum mohammed,my name is munir ,i live in venezuela
    if u nedd anything from canopus just send me a message

    my email is
    [email protected]


    shukkran

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_MD
    replied
    Originally posted by T-Bone View Post
    Kenneally is, of course, technically correct re the DV hardware codec chip - and by "technically correct," I don't at all mean to imply that KH is trying to hide the ball or anything like that - but Mike's answer gets closer to the bottom line re the effect of a Storm (or NX) card on Edius:



    General rule: While you're editing - your project is not yet finished and you are working on the timeline - the Storm (or NX) card does absolutely nothing to accelerate what Edius can do processing the timeline, whether you're in HD or SD.

    The exception is if you edit with an external monitor connected to your camera/deck and your camera/deck connected to your computer:

    A. Without the Storm (or NX) card, you connect your camera/deck to your OHCI firewire on your computer, and your cpu must do the DV conversion to send the DV stream down the firewire to your camera/deck and out to the monitor; but

    B. With the Storm (or NX) card, you connect your camera/deck to the Storm (or NX) card on your computer, and the DV hardware codec chip on the Storm (or NX) card does the DV conversion to send the DV stream down the firewire to your camera/deck and out to the monitor, thereby freeing up the cpu to do other things (like Edius processing the timeline).

    So, unless you edit with a monitor attached to your computer through firewire, Edius will run just as fast processing the timeline with or without a Storm (or NX) card.


    You typed it out more detailed then I did! :)



    Mike

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  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    Harris is correct.

    The difference is only if you have realtime DV output enabled (and of course you're in a project mode that supports this).

    In OHCI modes, the CPU is tasked with the realtime DV compression.
    With DVRex-RT/DVStorm/DVRaptor-RT2/EDIUS NX/EDIUS SP the hardware DV codec does the realtime DV conversion, so there's more CPU power "available" for EDIUS to use.

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  • GrassValley_KH
    replied
    Actually we're all right, alright? *laugh*

    DVStorm, DVRex RT, EDIUS NX and EDIUS SP all have that DV chip.

    And yes, the boost it provides when you have the option "Realtime DV Output" checked is fairly minor in today's era of computing, but the (old and new) boards just feel more responsive than that of a software-only system.

    And that's about it on Hardware codecs - we're straying off topic.

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  • pjsssss
    replied
    I don't think that is quite true Harris and I hope KH corrects me if I am wrong.

    Storm and Rex are in different categories then NX and SP. The first 2 do have some acceleration (DV only) while the later 2 do not. It used to be very noticable when computers were not as powerful.

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  • T-Bone
    replied
    Kenneally is, of course, technically correct re the DV hardware codec chip - and by "technically correct," I don't at all mean to imply that KH is trying to hide the ball or anything like that - but Mike's answer gets closer to the bottom line re the effect of a Storm (or NX) card on Edius:

    Originally posted by GrassValley_MD View Post
    Actually those boards are not acceleration boards. They are really for I/O only.

    The slight power boost from having the overlay and the real time output are so small now that they don't [produce] any noticeable difference.
    General rule: While you're editing - your project is not yet finished and you are working on the timeline - the Storm (or NX) card does absolutely nothing to accelerate what Edius can do processing the timeline, whether you're in HD or SD.

    The exception is if you edit with an external monitor connected to your camera/deck and your camera/deck connected to your computer:

    A. Without the Storm (or NX) card, you connect your camera/deck to your OHCI firewire on your computer, and your cpu must do the DV conversion to send the DV stream down the firewire to your camera/deck and out to the monitor; but

    B. With the Storm (or NX) card, you connect your camera/deck to the Storm (or NX) card on your computer, and the DV hardware codec chip on the Storm (or NX) card does the DV conversion to send the DV stream down the firewire to your camera/deck and out to the monitor, thereby freeing up the cpu to do other things (like Edius processing the timeline).

    So, unless you edit with a monitor attached to your computer through firewire, Edius will run just as fast processing the timeline with or without a Storm (or NX) card.
    Last edited by T-Bone; 05-25-2007, 05:23 AM.

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  • GrassValley_KH
    replied
    EDIUS NX, EDIUS SP, EDIUS DVX (aka DVStorm XA Plus), and DVStorm(2(Pro)) all feature a hardware Canopus DV codec chip - its purpose is to generate a DV/DVCAM output stream on-the-fly from the timeline, and alleviate the CPU (which is how OHCI systems work).

    It's a bit different than the software DV codec, which is used to read from/write to files to a disk.

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  • GrassValley_MD
    replied
    Originally posted by Aristotelis View Post
    This is very usefull info BH...Thanks...
    I have one question though
    Does the use of Canopus software DV codec has anything to do with DV editing hardware acceleration that boards like DVStorm, DVX provide?

    Actually those boards are not acceleration boards. They are really for I/O only.

    The slight power boost from having the overlay and the real time output are so small now that they don't any noticeable difference.

    You will not see a difference in the editing speed of the MS wrapped DV and the Canopus DV.



    Mike

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  • Aristotelis
    replied
    This is very usefull info BH...Thanks...
    I have one question though
    Does the use of Canopus software DV codec has anything to do with DV editing hardware acceleration that boards like DVStorm, DVX provide?

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    Unless things have changed, the checkbox only determines what Four-CC code is written to the AVI file. The Canopus DV codec is still used to produce the DV stream either way.

    If the "Use MSDV" checkbox is not checked, then the Canopus DV codec produces a DV stream that is put into an AVI file marked as CDVC (Canopus DV codec Four-CC).

    If the "Use MSDV" checkbox is checked, then the Canopus DV codec produces a DV stream that is put into an AVI file marked as DVSD (Microsoft DV codec Four-CC).

    This is similar to how you can get the same LCD monitor electronics branded as a HP monitor, a BenQ monitor, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • vienna1944er
    replied
    Thanks for clarify about the "4:2:0 detail"..........

    I understood you correct with >> the difference between print to file with
    a) aktivated button "Use MSDV codec" or b) without activated button "Use MSDV codec"
    is only the better written algorithms from "CanopusDV codec" or is there still other things aviable ??

    i.e. 0-250 compare 16-235 ...or is this likewise ditto only >EDIUS's internal <

    old Hans

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  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    The Canopus DV codec is 4:1:1 for NTSC, and 4:2:0 for PAL. Otherwise it wouldn't be DV-spec-legal.

    EDIUS's internal processing is 4:2:2 or better (depends on what it's doing).

    Leave a comment:


  • vienna1944er
    replied
    First generation DV files are replicas from your DV tape.
    Quality loss comes into play when you re-render the same DV file with a DV codec, and Canopus DV was always the best one out of the bunch.
    what I guessing to know:
    a) PAL DV on the tape s always 4:2:0 \ 25Mbit/sec
    b) Canopus DV codec is 4:2:2
    c) DV-Standard enforces by "print to tape" 4:2:0 [from whatever timeline- codec is activated ( i.e. 4:2:2)]

    Question's about what I [unfortunately] not know exactly:
    PAL-DV tape >> captured with Edius (Output format:DV50i; Rendering Format: DV AVI)
    created the media-file in the ".avi wrapper" on the disk..... and this file have the specification
    1) the same as DV tape-source = 4:2:0 ??
    2) Canopus-DV avi = 4:2:2 ??

    Question about Export >> Print to File >> DV AVI (ExporterPlugIn of DV compressed AVI file)
    3) with aktivated button "Use MSDV codec" >> up as 4:2:0 ??
    4) without activated button "Use MSDV codec" >> end up as CanopusDV with 4:2:2 ??

    Question about Export per PCE >> Video Editing Format >>
    5) with setting: CanopusDV AVI >> end up as 4:2:2 ??
    6) with setting: MS-DV Avi >> end up as 4:2:0 ??

    friendly asking greetings from europe\austria\vienna ....old Hans

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  • STORMDAVE
    replied
    DV AVI just wraps DV data under the AVI extension, AND you can either use the Canopus DV codec or check the "Use Microsoft DV codec" and it will use the standard MSDV codec.

    DV Stream just creates a .dv file without any wrappers. Use the former.

    What we need to know is what are you going to do with your DV files? If you're using Edius, just capture as you always did. If you're going between Premiere Pro and Edius etc, use MSDV.

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  • Julian
    replied
    What is the difference between DV AVI and DV Stream in Edius?

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:

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