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Taking the plunge - HDV or AVCHD

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  • Fred Dwyer
    replied
    Originally posted by ixlor8 View Post
    Quality of HV20 video converted from HDV to SD DVD is better than the SD video from the Canon GL2 camcorder.

    Rick
    Rick:
    How's the comparison with the GL2 hold up in low light? I use a GL1 in marginal light in churches and am satisfied with it, but for camera 2 I've been using an Optura Xi. The Optura's low light performance is poor. Often have to set shutter speed to 1/30. Lots of work in post to make the footage useful. Been thinking about getting an HV20.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blast1
    replied
    The Canon HV20 (and the newer HV30 - same camera a few improvements)
    Few improvements is right, not worth the $400 price difference, the HV20s are fast disappearing at the current price point.

    Leave a comment:


  • plasma_video
    replied
    Thank you all for your comments. They've been a great help.

    Most of my shooting is for "home movies", church productions and a few steps up, but I am going to be doing several videos for non-profit groups this year as well as some more major endevours. My goal is to get a better camera later in the year with more professional features, and use whatever I purchase now for a second "b-roll" camera. The price point is unbelievable, considering I can get the Canon for half the price I paid for my first generation Sony MiniDV

    The advantages of the tapeless MPEG-4 format are appealing, but I have been concerned about possible artifacts and difficulties editing. I think I would go that route if it were strictly for family videos.

    HDV has been proven to be fairly robust, and the way it can be used with EDIUS and Vegas are selling points. Plus, I could better mix footage for now with the old camera, shooting in SD.

    I have a place I can order from that will let me return the camera within 30 days if it does not do as promised, so I think I'll give the Canon a shot.

    Thanks again everyone.

    Tom

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  • AJL14
    replied
    Hi Tom,

    We have done extensive tests comparing AVCHD and HDV - so here are our conclusions:

    A great part of your decision lies on what you intend to do with your final videos. If you are recording "home movies" or archival material to display on "small" screens, you probably won't notice much difference between the 2 formats. However, there are picture artifacts displayed in the AVCHD format. It's MPEG4 (HDD or BluRay), not MPEG2 (which is what HDV is), and the compression is greater in THIS version of MPEG4, resulting in a picture that when displayed on a "large" screen - say 52 inches or more - is definitely visable. Although, this is more apparent on side-by-side comparisons of the two formats. HDV is, without a doubt, the cleaner picture - but again I stress that this is only on larger screens - the larger the more you can see the compression, obviously.

    That said, there are terrific advantages to AVCHD. No tapes to carry around, load and unload! Hard drives are getting larger, HD-DVD discs are getting less expensive and memory cards are just around the corner for the "home" cameras.

    However, we've shot over 200 hours of HDV and never lost a second of video. We had a clitch on one of the hard-drives recording AVCHD and didn't know it until too late. But this is quite rare. We have not vibration tested the AVCHD cameras, but the HDV cameras are basically impervious to vibration and hard knocks during recording. Other than falling off a cliff!

    The Canon HV20 (and the newer HV30 - same camera a few improvements) gives a super picture, and has the best optical image stabilization in the business - bar none! You can't go wrong with this camera.

    I don't know what kind of photog stores are available to you in Virginia, but if possible, ask them to let you shoot some footage "in the store" with both cameras and then see what the difference is yourself - if a monitor is available.

    The best of luck to you. I hate making decisions like this! ! !

    Cheers,
    Alan

    Leave a comment:


  • Thor
    replied
    Tom,

    I have 2 DVStorms that I have used for several years. I just purchased an NX card with HD Expansion (PCI-X variety) for editing in HD.

    I will be installing it in a third machine, based on an Iwill DK8N. I chose this board because it was Canopus certifed for the NX and HD.

    I will continue to edit in SD with the Storms and Premiere, but will be learning Edius with with the NX on the DK8N machine.

    It appears you may need to do the same thing for HD editing. The PCI-X version of the NX is getting hard to find, but the PCIe versions, in the U.S. at least, is more prevalent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Evans
    replied
    If you want to edit easily then HDV is the way to go. AVCHD cams have a real advantage for the average consumer in that logging clips etc is very convenient with the supplied software ( at least for Sony) and simple cuts only editing with this software is also very easy to make DVD's or AVCHD disc for play on Blu-ray players. Playback from the AVCHD camera is also convenient for picking and playing clips for family etc as these can be seen on the LCD and be selected, or search with several ways none of which are possible with HDV or tape based cameras. For that reason I have both!!! FX1 plus several DV cams and a Sony SR7. The choice for family events is the AVCHD SR7, no fear of running out of tape, and instant clip selection and playback for the group. On my Panasonic Plasma it is almost impossible to tell the difference to my FX1 in good light. The FX1 wins in low light as to be expected. But as far as the family are concerned the SR7 is just fine in low light!!!!!!! AVCHD can be converted, for easier editing, to HQ but this takes a long time on my AMD X4200 so I edit my mix of AVCHD and HDV in Vegas that seems to manage native files of both a little easier than Edius.
    If your only going to buy one camera then buy the HDV since it will be easier to edit and can still shoot DV to mix with your other cameras. For family convenience I would still choose the AVCHD cam.

    Ron Evans

    Leave a comment:


  • ixlor8
    replied
    I have a HV20. I do not need a special capture device but just the Firewire port. If you have a fast enough computer, it will capture the HDV and convert it to ConopusHQ AVI in real time. The files are larger, but quality is fantastic.

    Edius does a great job with converting the 1440 x1080 to 740x480. Print to DVD works very well. Quality of HV20 video converted from HDV to SD DVD is better than the SD video from the Canon GL2 camcorder.

    Both the camcorder and Edius work very well.

    Rick

    Leave a comment:


  • plasma_video
    started a topic Taking the plunge - HDV or AVCHD

    Taking the plunge - HDV or AVCHD

    Well, Im about to take the plunge, as my 12 year old Sony DV camera is getting flaky.

    I'm curious as to opinions about the 2 different formats. From my research, it looks like HDV would be the way to go, especially as EDIUS is my prime editing software. I have a Storm 2 card or OHCI available - not an NX card, so I'm not sure where this will lead.

    I can pick up a Canon HV20 for a song, so I'm looking seriously at that, as it will shoot in SD onto mini-dv tapes and might be a good "bridge" between SD and HD until I'm better setup for HD or get any real demand for HD content.

    As I understand it, I can use 1394 to grab the HDV footage, and then convert it to Canopus HQ in the bin. Will this work OK with the Storm card, or will I need to upgrade that before doing any serious HD work? I know the Storm card cannot output HD to a monitor, but for now, I will still be working in SD, so I don't think that's a serious concern.

    Any opinions would be appreciated!

    Thanks!

    Tom
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