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  • Imagine Video
    replied
    Hi George I will give it a go in another system that has sata ability!

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Bassman
    replied
    Thanks George.

    I am looking at a Gigabyte motherboard for a possible upgrade.

    I called Gigabyte and asked if a SATA I and SATA II drive were on their controller together, would the SATA II drive operate at SATA I speeds.

    They said only in a RAID configuration.

    I am not planning on a raid for the OS drive.

    So if this is true, is the speed of a Raptor for the OS drive noteworthy or have "normal" drives closed the gap?

    I guess I am asking if the 150 gig Raptor's speed worth the extra $40-60?

    I will have an enterprise drive for my scratch disc/secondary drive.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • gdame
    replied
    Originally posted by Bassman View Post
    George,

    I would like to ask you about this. So SATA II is more important that the faster speeds of the Raptor?

    If you could separate the drives so the other drives functioned at SATA II levels, would you still recommend not using a raptor for the system drive?

    Thanks
    Bassman, there is nothing wrong with the Raptor. In SATA-150 days That is what I used for system drives. Only now-a-days I can use a 250 - 500 GB SATA-300 system drive for the same or less money. The enterprise series drives from Seagate are better performers than most SATA-300 drives and have a 5 year warrantee. If you where to move that Raptor to another PCI controller you may be be sharing with a device that you may not want to. So I do not think that is worth the hassel. Use it for now, when you decide to make a disk image clone for back up, buy a 250GB SATA-300 drive and use it for a while. You always got a back up then. So it is not a major deal unless you need the full SATA-300 speed on the other shared SATA-300 ports.

    Leave a comment:


  • gdame
    replied
    Originally posted by Imagine Video View Post
    GrassValley_BH & Gdame

    So you think at some stage a BOOT record was written to the RAID and that is why when connected the system will not boot past it?

    If so I need to get rid of this Boot record.........What a complication, who needs this stress.

    GrassValley_BH do you mean SeaTools? does this have the commands needed?

    GrassValley_BH you have used this utility to do this very thing?

    I have downloaded it BUT I need a little hand holding here if possible

    Sorry you guys I know this is a little labour intensive...............I am in uncharted waters here.........


    I cant wait to post a NORMAL editing problem How nice that would be at this stage instead off all this.................

    Cathryn
    Cathryn,

    Seatools does have the utility to zero a drive. I have not used it in years so I could not take you through a stsep by step tutorial. Dig into there help files if you decide to go that route. Note that this will take a good long time on each of those large drives, as it will write a zero to each and every data block.

    The fdisk \mbr method that I mentioned above is effective and takes only a split second to do. Four drives would be done in the time it takes to boot the system to DOS four times.

    If you followed my instructions regarding boot devices listed and boot order, then you are all set at the mainboard level. Just gotta zing those raid drives.

    Remember, to disconnect you raptor and your 200GB drive completely. Do not have any hard drives connected to your system.

    You will need a DOS boot disk or boot CD

    connect one of the raid drives to the sata cable that was connected to your raptor.

    Set your 1st boot device in the mainboard bios to the appropriate floppy or cd/dvd drive.

    Boot to DOS and run fdisk \mbr

    hit enter and zing it's done.

    Shut down connect the next drive and repeat.

    Then reconnect all drive and raid back and reset the boot device order in the mainboard bios.

    Remove the DOS disk and boot up the system.

    At the HighPoint bios enter it and set up your raid by initializing the drives and setting up the appropriate raid level.

    You should be good to go!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bassman
    replied
    Originally posted by gdame View Post
    BTW, your Raptor system drive is only a SATA-150 drive. I do not use these any more.
    George,

    I would like to ask you about this. So SATA II is more important that the faster speeds of the Raptor?

    If you could separate the drives so the other drives functioned at SATA II levels, would you still recommend not using a raptor for the system drive?

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Imagine Video
    replied
    George - I have emailed you - and now the server is down so I am using this way

    Looking at the highpoint raid user manual on page 17

    Set Boot Mark - this function is used to designate a particular disk or RAID array to
    function as the RocketRAID 2310’s boot device.
    Note: This setting is only relevant if the motherboard’s BIOS has set the
    RocketRAID 2310 to function as the system’s primary boot device.

    I have not got this marked in the motherboard bios at all so it should not be a problem

    Cath

    Leave a comment:


  • Imagine Video
    replied
    GrassValley_BH & Gdame

    So you think at some stage a BOOT record was written to the RAID and that is why when connected the system will not boot past it?

    If so I need to get rid of this Boot record.........What a complication, who needs this stress.

    GrassValley_BH do you mean SeaTools? does this have the commands needed?

    GrassValley_BH you have used this utility to do this very thing?

    I have downloaded it BUT I need a little hand holding here if possible

    Sorry you guys I know this is a little labour intensive...............I am in uncharted waters here.........


    I cant wait to post a NORMAL editing problem How nice that would be at this stage instead off all this.................

    Cathryn

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    I find the manufacturer's test utility is especially useful for zero-ing drives, though this usually entails connecting the drive to a non-RAID controller so the test utility can see the drive.

    The thing about most hardware RAID controllers is that it saves an array "signature" to the disks, and because that "signature" is outside of what the OS normally sees it's a bit difficult to get rid of.

    Leave a comment:


  • gdame
    replied
    Originally posted by Imagine Video View Post
    Hi George

    Well I have rebuilt the system and I am as of now with a clean install:

    ASUS P5K64WS
    INTEL QUAD CORE CPU 3ghz
    OCZ 1333 MGHZ MEMORY 2 GIG
    WD 74GIG RAPTOR SYSTEM DRIVE
    200 GIG SATA 2 STORAGE DRIVE
    PIONEER DVD RW 115B

    WINDOWS XP PRO
    WINDOWS XP SP 2 installed
    Video card and latest drivers installed

    System is running nice and all well

    Place Highpoint rocket raid into pcie slot under video card


    SYSTEM BOOTS through it and detects the card......................


    So where do you go from here on your builds......

    (and would you remove all the exsisting raid drives and reformat them then rebuild raid)


    Cath
    Hi Cathryn,

    I would do a bit more than just re-format each of the raid drives. I ran into a situation recently where I forgot to pull a jumper on the ASUS P5WDH Deluxe' onbord raid controller to change the default mirror (raid 1) mode to striped (raid 0) mode. I had started the system up all the way to windows and realized that raid drive was only half of what it should have been listed in disk manager.

    Nothing I could do to those disks would change that from this point forward. So I disconnected all hard disks to the mainboard and connected each of these four disks to the primary SATA connection on the mainboard and ran "fdisk \mbr" (fdisk space \mbr) from a dos boot CD. This zinged the master boot record and after doing all four disks, 1 at a time, I set up the system as it should be and all was fine. I never missed that jumper again :)

    BTW, your Raptor system drive is only a SATA-150 drive. I do not use these any more. If this is connected to the same controller as your 200 GB SATA-II drive then your SATA-II drive is being knocked down to SATA-150 speed! ;( It's not a real big deal. I would make the 200GB the OS drive and then make a disk image back up to the Raptor and let it sit unplugged until needed for quick recovery. Then get a great deal on a 500, 750 or 1TB SATA-II disk in the future to have additional faster storage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Imagine Video
    replied
    Hi George

    Well I have rebuilt the system and I am as of now with a clean install:

    ASUS P5K64WS
    INTEL QUAD CORE CPU 3ghz
    OCZ 1333 MGHZ MEMORY 2 GIG
    WD 74GIG RAPTOR SYSTEM DRIVE
    200 GIG SATA 2 STORAGE DRIVE
    PIONEER DVD RW 115B

    WINDOWS XP PRO
    WINDOWS XP SP 2 installed
    Video card and latest drivers installed

    System is running nice and all well

    Place Highpoint rocket raid into pcie slot under video card


    SYSTEM BOOTS through it and detects the card......................


    So where do you go from here on your builds......

    (and would you remove all the exsisting raid drives and reformat them then rebuild raid)


    Cath

    Leave a comment:


  • Imagine Video
    replied
    Great guys - Thanks I will try that today!!!

    If I remove the card the system boots normal BUT I have always put the card back in with drives still attached!! SO I will try JUST the card!

    I will disable all OTHER devises in the Bios also.

    Will report back! fingers crossed

    And thanks.........

    Leave a comment:


  • gdame
    replied
    Originally posted by GrassValley_BH View Post

    Cathryn - if you disconnect the data cable from the RAID drives (but leave the controller installed), does the system still hang at the same point?
    This would be the acid test. Let us know Cathryn!

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    Originally posted by gdame View Post
    Brandon, could there be a boot record left on the raid drives from one of the earlier configs that the system is somehow seeing first? It is just not making sense.
    Possibly... but unlikely at best.

    Normally I'd point to something in the Windows startup, but it sounds like this all happens before Windows even tries to start.

    Maybe the Highpoint BIOS is giving some kind of warning that the RAID is not initialized (or otherwise "dirty") ?

    One that I don't particularly like about the Highpoint cards is that they require user intervention to boot when there's a problem.

    Cathryn - if you disconnect the data cable from the RAID drives (but leave the controller installed), does the system still hang at the same point?

    Leave a comment:


  • gdame
    replied
    Originally posted by gdame View Post
    Cathryn,

    I found the info that you where reffering to at the High Point site in the faq's.

    Boot order I choose CD, hard disk (make sure this lists your actual "C" drive model #) disable all other boot options.

    Try this and let me know.
    Brandon, this was my recommendation a few posts back. I am not if Cathryn has indeed set this.

    Cathryn, could you check your boot devices in the mainboard bios?

    Make absolutly sure that you only have these two boot devices listed CD & your "system drive" and all others disabled completely, not just put to the bottom of the list.

    Brandon, could there be a boot record left on the raid drives from one of the earlier configs that the system is somehow seeing first? It is just not making sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    I think (not sure, never tried) you can un-mark the drive as bootable in the Highpoint BIOS setup.

    The motherboard BIOS has prime determination for which device to try to boot from, from available boot-capable devices. Depending on the BIOS vendor, the options are different. You want to check both the Boot Order, and the Boot Devices.
    There may also be an option for "Boot from Other Devices"

    Usually you'll see one of two things - if you have a Boot tab, then there will be an option for "Bootable Add-on cards" - you want to put that last on the list.
    If your BIOS has the Award-type "1st Boot Device" "2nd Boot Device" type, then set everything past the 1st device to None. Generally bootable add-on cards in this style of BIOS will be set as SCSI (even if they're not SCSI cards).

    I'd disable everything possible. At some point the system shouldn't boot into Windows. Then re-enable one by one until it does.

    There's also the possibility that the add-in card BIOS boot load order is finicky (I had this happen on a server mobo with two GigE cards and a 3ware controller) - in this case the only real option you have is to move card positions. Because some storage controllers are considered "off-board" even though the controller's built onto the motherboard, it still may load like an add-in card. What I'm trying to say here (sorry, I'm sick so organizing thoughts is proving more challenging than normal) is that you might only have one card to move... but it's worth trying to move it if the above doesn't work, and provided you can...

    Leave a comment:

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