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  • Videoscope numbers

    Hi,

    Just wondering how to make sense of the RGB numbers in the videoscope window?

    In photoshop and most RGB design software, the values are at a range from 0-255, but it edius it seems to be in the high 800s as you go towards white.

    Ideally I'd love them to display in the 0-255 range but not sure if it's possible.

    Any ideas?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    switch project setting from 709 to 601, when done, switch back to 709
    Anton Strauss
    Antons Video Productions - Sydney

    EDIUS X WG with BM Mini Monitor 4k and BM Mini Recorder, Gigabyte X299 UD4 Pro, Intel Core i9 9960X 16 Core, 32 Threads @ 4.3Ghz, Corsair Water Cooling, Gigabyte RTX-2070 Super 3X 8GB Video Card, Samsung 860 Pro 512GB SSD for System, 8TB Samsung Raid0 SSD for Video, 2 Pioneer BDR-209 Blu-ray/DVD burners, Hotswap Bay for 3.5" Sata and 2.5" SSD, Phanteks Enthoo Pro XL Tower, Corsair 32GB DDR4 Ram, Win10 Pro

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    • #3
      Hmmm - tried the switch (both versions of 601) but didn't make any difference to the scope numbers.

      Do I have to exit and then restart edius to see the changes?

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      • #4
        iam using edius 7 still.. and RGB is 0-255 no matter what.
        lucky me i guess!

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        • #5
          I'm actually not even sure what these 800x number represent having never come across them before. Familiar with RGB, CMYK and YUV (a little)

          Are the definitely something to do with the colour space?

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          • #6
            I have to admit I never look at the numbers but after a quick check here I get 0-255 in an 8 bit project and lot higher in a 10 bit project, which would make sense as a 10 bit project has a larger range of colours.
            EDIUS silver certified trainer.
            Main edit laptop: DVC Kaby Lake desktop processor laptop, 32GB RAM, 3.5Ghz i5 desktop processor, nVidia 1060, Windows 10.
            Desktop: 4Ghz 9900K processor, 32GB RAM, nVidia 1660TI GPU, Windows 10.
            Desktop: 2Ghz 12 core Xeon processor, 32GB RAM, nVidia 1060, BM Intensity Pro, Windows 10

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            • #7
              A workaround is to use Pixie from : http://www.nattyware.com/?m31

              This little module can be opend anytime and gives you the colors value situated under the arrow of the mouse.

              Very practical for any opened program (photo, video, powerpoint,...) It gives the exact color generate by the graphic card.

              So, you drive the arrow in the windows player of Edius and you have the colors of the video.

              I use it everyday...
              Yvon durieux alias "Haddock" Belgium GMT + 2

              Sorry for my poor english, I am french native speaking

              Main System: Azus Z87 Pro, [email protected], 16gb ram, Nvidia GeForce GT 630, Windows 7 Pro 64, Samsung 840 pro, Edius 8.53.2808 WG and 9.54.6706 + NXexpress or HDspark, 2T separate video SSD.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by thebtrain View Post
                Hmmm - tried the switch (both versions of 601) but didn't make any difference to the scope numbers.

                Do I have to exit and then restart edius to see the changes?

                ahahh, you may also be on 10bit as mentioned, try 8bit
                Anton Strauss
                Antons Video Productions - Sydney

                EDIUS X WG with BM Mini Monitor 4k and BM Mini Recorder, Gigabyte X299 UD4 Pro, Intel Core i9 9960X 16 Core, 32 Threads @ 4.3Ghz, Corsair Water Cooling, Gigabyte RTX-2070 Super 3X 8GB Video Card, Samsung 860 Pro 512GB SSD for System, 8TB Samsung Raid0 SSD for Video, 2 Pioneer BDR-209 Blu-ray/DVD burners, Hotswap Bay for 3.5" Sata and 2.5" SSD, Phanteks Enthoo Pro XL Tower, Corsair 32GB DDR4 Ram, Win10 Pro

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                • #9
                  8-bit numeric values (in decimal) range from 0 to 255 (in binary 00000000 to 11111111)
                  10-bit numeric values range from 0 to 1023

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                  • #10
                    Yep - 10 bit colour is what it was. Switched to 8 bit and back in the 0-255 range.

                    Thanks for the help all :)

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