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mobo for edius Nx and PCIe Raid controller

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  • GrassValley_KH
    replied
    EDIUS project presets have a very strong connection between video equipment manufacturing and its own hardware (output) capabilities. This goes a long way to explain why EDIUS does not support arbitrary frame sizes, frame rates or colour spaces.

    Every single aspect of EDIUS has to be tailored to deliver the most optimised, realtime edit/playback performance.

    So to round out the question (which is more than a little off-topic from the original post) - EDIUS engineers need to talk to Red engineers, to work it into the software.

    The good news is that Red support isn't outside the realm of possibilities with the EDIUS engine, and that given the noise it's starting to make (beyond 'vapourware' now), supporting Red-based specifications is something I'm sure will be scrutinised further down the development track. What is important to remember is EDIUS' core design philosophy (on realtime performance) - that is paramount. Without it, EDIUS becomes 'just another NLE' in the dust trails of bigger players.

    Now, let's stick to the topic at hand, shall we? :)

    Leave a comment:


  • xeberdee
    replied
    Getting on this a bit late but - why can't I edit red footage on Edius??

    FCP is already editing proxy from Red, making final cut again one step ahead of everybody, and forcing high profile companies to take a look at FCP.

    If I could choose between saying

    "Why would you want to Edit Red on Edius? Edius doesn't do 10bit, 4K - bla bla"

    or

    "Why doesn't Edius let me edit Red, 10 bit, 2K, 4K etc"

    I would choose to say the latter.

    HEY - I did say that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by tingsern View Post
    I am not aware of any either today. Maybe Adobe Premiere will use all the cores? I do know that most video encoding programs (Sorenson, Procoder, etc) will use as many cores as you can have. And of course, there's AE as well.

    I'm not sure that Procoder uses as many as you have. It does not max out on my each of my quad cores. However, it does on my dual Extreme chip.
    I think there was a discussion on this a while back. Premiere CS3, as far as I can tell, doesn't use ever how many either. AE has a setting to allow it to use multiple cores.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Jerry View Post
    I hate to say it, but, if you are editing Red Cam material, you might consider a different editor and system. Edius can not do 2k or 4k files, 10bit uncompressed or compressed, or native Red Cam footage anyway.
    The Franken macs offer multiple pci-e slots and I believe will do Red Cam footage... or...
    You might want to look at a high end gaming board. Ususally these come with 4 pci-e slots. Now you have to decide if you want pci-e or pci-e 2.0.
    I wouldn't buy a new board without that little add on. The new stoakly seaburg models have that as well as many of the gaming boards being released now.

    http://usa.asus.com/products.aspx?l1...41&modelmenu=2

    This is an older chipset, but very good and stable. It may or may not be what you are looking for. I have heard of forum users using this board.
    Check it out. It will use 45nm chips.
    no worries, wouldnt try editing red footage in edius ;)
    theres a workaround for avid, also avid guys assured me they were working on native support... red looks crazy good by the way.

    boardwise: therese also newer asus offerings with 4 pcie slots:
    http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1...73&modelmenu=1
    but with my dual slot graphics card (passive, silence an issue) i'd have to shove graphics card in lowermost slot and pray that the actual graphics slot eats a raid controller, which they often dont.
    there's also a board with an ideal layout for me:
    http://www2.abit.com.tw/page/en/moth...&fMTYPE=LGA775
    but its an abit gaming rig and i'm wetting my pants at the thought of relying on it to do edius and pcie raid. their name doesnt pop up on the campatible/recommended list of any controller manufacturer. but then again... i've also seen a 3ware 9650 on an asrock board once that didnt spit fumes...
    if only tyan were a LOT faster about their twiddelings. bummer.

    Leave a comment:


  • tingsern
    replied
    I am not aware of any either today. Maybe Adobe Premiere will use all the cores? I do know that most video encoding programs (Sorenson, Procoder, etc) will use as many cores as you can have. And of course, there's AE as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by tingsern View Post
    Unfortunately, no gaming boards support Xeon processors ... that leaves you with only one physical processor chip. If your editing program needs more horsepower than one Intel Core 2 Quad - then you are out of luck. At least with Xeon - you have up to 8 physical processors today (2 x quad core).

    Which editing software uses more than 4 cores for editing? Remember, Edius only utilizes 2. I would be curious to know which editing package will utilize 8 cores. If there is one, I might have to look in that direction. I don't know if FCP2 will utilize more than 2/4. If you are also using AE, yes the 8 will come in handy.

    Leave a comment:


  • tingsern
    replied
    Unfortunately, no gaming boards support Xeon processors ... that leaves you with only one physical processor chip. If your editing program needs more horsepower than one Intel Core 2 Quad - then you are out of luck. At least with Xeon - you have up to 8 physical processors today (2 x quad core).

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by the_count View Post
    boys, we're drifting off....
    i still dont't know what board to buy, need 4 available pcie slots while using dual slot graphics.
    still, my recommendation: don't buy pci-x hardware now, the whole industry is shifting towards pci-e. the latest 3ware controllers are only available in pci-e flavour (9690, 9650) areca: same picture, their new 800mhz controllers can go up to 820MB/s, on pci-x or pci-e 4x you'd get bus saturation, thas why pcie x8 is the way to go.
    editing red cam material for example would be tricky using pci-x.

    WHAT BOARD? DOESNT ANYBODY USE EDIUS NX + COMPONENT + PCIE RAID?
    I hate to say it, but, if you are editing Red Cam material, you might consider a different editor and system. Edius can not do 2k or 4k files, 10bit uncompressed or compressed, or native Red Cam footage anyway.
    The Franken macs offer multiple pci-e slots and I believe will do Red Cam footage... or...
    You might want to look at a high end gaming board. Ususally these come with 4 pci-e slots. Now you have to decide if you want pci-e or pci-e 2.0.
    I wouldn't buy a new board without that little add on. The new stoakly seaburg models have that as well as many of the gaming boards being released now.

    http://usa.asus.com/products.aspx?l1...41&modelmenu=2

    This is an older chipset, but very good and stable. It may or may not be what you are looking for. I have heard of forum users using this board.
    Check it out. It will use 45nm chips.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Back to the topic

    boys, we're drifting off....
    i still dont't know what board to buy, need 4 available pcie slots while using dual slot graphics.
    still, my recommendation: don't buy pci-x hardware now, the whole industry is shifting towards pci-e. the latest 3ware controllers are only available in pci-e flavour (9690, 9650) areca: same picture, their new 800mhz controllers can go up to 820MB/s, on pci-x or pci-e 4x you'd get bus saturation, thas why pcie x8 is the way to go.
    editing red cam material for example would be tricky using pci-x.

    WHAT BOARD? DOESNT ANYBODY USE EDIUS NX + COMPONENT + PCIE RAID?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by tingsern View Post
    There is nothing "lowly" about PCI-X bus. It is an evolution that brought it there.

    The "X" - is a "parallel" bus - and that puts very tight constraints on timing signals transferring data on it.

    PCI-e - is a "serial" bus - and makes things easier for the h/w chip designer (or motherboard layout designer).

    As I explained previously, the "X" bandwidth is 1GB/sec. To saturate it, you need 20 hard-disks transferring data simultaneously ... I think, for 99.9% of the folks out there, you will never ever get a PCI-X bus limit reached.

    Holy Cow! How could you miss the sarcasm in my previous statement?
    Thanks Pat! It felt like the old Canopus forum from around 2000 for a minute there.

    Leave a comment:


  • pjsssss
    replied
    I think Jerry is being a little tongue in cheek with the "lowly" comment. We have discussed systems many times.

    Leave a comment:


  • tingsern
    replied
    There is nothing "lowly" about PCI-X bus. It is an evolution that brought it there.

    The "X" - is a "parallel" bus - and that puts very tight constraints on timing signals transferring data on it.

    PCI-e - is a "serial" bus - and makes things easier for the h/w chip designer (or motherboard layout designer).

    As I explained previously, the "X" bandwidth is 1GB/sec. To saturate it, you need 20 hard-disks transferring data simultaneously ... I think, for 99.9% of the folks out there, you will never ever get a PCI-X bus limit reached.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry
    replied
    Originally posted by pjsssss View Post
    In addition to what Ting said, a lot, if not most, of us with high end systems use server mobos. So we are comparing apples to apples.
    I was noticing some of the new seaburg models still have that lowly pci-x slot
    included. I don't see it going away any time soon. One of the supermicro boards had everything on it that I need. It surprised me that it still had 3.3v
    pci slots.
    It all depends on how the chipset handles the bus. Newer chipsets seem to handle this better than my earlier Asus P5WDG2WS PRO.
    It is now 2 years old, and due for an upgrade next year. I will probably move to a dual quad seaburg model with pci-x.

    Leave a comment:


  • pjsssss
    replied
    In addition to what Ting said, a lot, if not most, of us with high end systems use server mobos. So we are comparing apples to apples.

    Leave a comment:


  • tingsern
    replied
    The bandwidth available on PCI-X (64 bits) is more than enough - at 133mhz, the bus can transfer 1GB/sec. PCIe (at 16 lanes) is 4GB/sec - but, that's reserved for the video card on most motherboards. PCIe at 4 lanes is the same as PCI-X at 133mhz (1GB/sec).

    The limitation is not (and has never been) the bus bandwidth. It lies with the hard-disk. Nearly all hard-disks today only stream data at 50MB/sec at the most. I am talking about continuous data speed - not burst rates. To saturate the PCI-X bus - you need at least 1GB/50MB = 20 hard-disks in a RAID configuration. I don't think most people's workstation casing will even allow you to put in 16 drives ... 8 drives in hot swap bay is already nearly the top end.

    Leave a comment:

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