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  • #31
    Originally posted by antonsvideo View Post
    is the clip butted up to another clip? the normalize tool searches a window range of 300ms by default which is around 6 frames, so it could pick up info from adjoining clips if it is the same file just cut up

    in user settings duration, automatic correction, you can change it to a shorter time and see if that works better

    40ms = 1 frame

    let me know if a shorter time works better
    The shortest I could make it was 100 and that made it worse. It made the clip quieter. I had tried this with the clip in its own sequence with nothing around it and had the same effect.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by ntbone View Post
      The shortest I could make it was 100 and that made it worse. It made the clip quieter. I had tried this with the clip in its own sequence with nothing around it and had the same effect.

      ok, it was worth a try

      what I do is normalize a clip so that it peaks at -6 on the audio mixer VU (I always have audio mixer open)

      I then increase track height so I can see the waveform well, then I normalize the clip next to it and see if waveform height matches, if not, I click normalize again and change the value by rolling the mouse wheel

      I do this in my sleep now and already know what value to use if a waveform looks slightly lower or taller, I usually get it right with the first correction

      you can also normalize all selected clips in one hit and then correct the ones that look wrong, this is the fastest way

      for more precise and expensive jobs, I export the audio file and fix it in Soundforge
      Anton Strauss
      Antons Video Productions - Sydney

      EDIUS X WG with BM Mini Monitor 4k and BM Mini Recorder, Gigabyte X299 UD4 Pro, Intel Core i9 9960X 16 Core, 32 Threads @ 4.3Ghz, Corsair Water Cooling, Gigabyte RTX-2070 Super 3X 8GB Video Card, Samsung 860 Pro 512GB SSD for System, 8TB Samsung Raid0 SSD for Video, 2 Pioneer BDR-209 Blu-ray/DVD burners, Hotswap Bay for 3.5" Sata and 2.5" SSD, Phanteks Enthoo Pro XL Tower, Corsair 32GB DDR4 Ram, Win10 Pro 21H2

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      • #33
        Nicolas. If you have a number of quieter clips that you can see or hear. Why don't you just move their audio parts to a new audio track. Then you can just increase the channel fader to bring up all the lower parts to a better level compared to the louder parts. Doing the reverse with the louder parts will also give you some room to balance both if the dynamic head room is quite wide. It is really quick to do this and would help you mix the piece as opposed to applying anything to individual parts. Applying anything to individual clips is much harder to trace backwards later in a mix if you need to change things, and is not really how you would do audio mixing anyway. If you learn to sub group things it gives you a lot more control in the mix and is very fast. Plus, Edius can easily do this. This method of controlling parts is a standard way of dealing with audio in traditional audio/music post and also in film and TV audio production. Altering the core of any audio source through individual dynamic processing should really be a last resort, as it it will fundamentally take it away from other associated audio, and make it harder to mix.

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