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E6 Video/Black Levels + Waveform/Vector Scope

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  • #16
    Originally posted by GrassValley_BH View Post
    @Chuck: During the (non-Japan NTSC) editing process, you don't need to worry about black level unless:
    1. There is detail you need to preserve within the 0-7.5 IRE level
    2. There are negative IRE values

    You should worry about > 100 IRE levels and the visual look of any imported graphics, computer-sourced footage (scan-converted or video from computer output) or footage that has gone through any RGB processing.

    Those types of clips are dependent upon the RGB<->YCbCr conversion formula used, so you need to pay attention to them to avoid crushed/muddy blacks and illegal/dimmed whites.
    • One formula assumes the full RGB range should be mapped to the broadcast-safe range (for stills in EDIUS, this is the White setting)
    • While the other assumes the full RGB range should be mapped to the full YCbCr range (for stills in EDIUS, this is the Super White setting)

    As for the IRE Setup, the output hardware (or playback hardware in a file-based system) is tasked with adding IRE Setup on the analog output.

    Thus the production process for NTSC 7.5 IRE Setup and NTSC 0 IRE Setup is supposed to be identical. Of course, because of mistakes, misconceptions and outright misinformation in many cases, 'tis not always the case.

    Any video footage that claims to have been "compensated" for IRE Setup should definitely be looked at further. Sometimes they have raised/lowered black/white levels and require adjustment.
    96% of the work I do goes directly to the end user for corporate or personal use. The other 4% is to local cable stations for quickie commericals.

    The next level of challenge is shooting everything in HD and then delivering my content on SD DVDs as 16 x 9 videos. So your advice seems to be to work with the "0" black and maintain the "100" video levels. By using these as my bench mark I should make everyone happy, correct?

    In addition, should I send to Broadcast, may be I should add a note that my video was produced a "0" Black?

    It is just so hard trying to be CORRECT, but it is always my goal. However, being CORRECT will keep everyone happy.

    Thanks again to all of you who took time to reply. Again, it is just so wonderful to find knowledgeable just key strokes away and to also find that they are WILLING TO SHARE.

    Sincerest regards,
    Chuck
    Last edited by GrassValley_BH; 12-16-2010, 06:05 PM. Reason: Fixed quote tagging

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    • #17
      Broadcasters expect a digital stream at 0 . If not your footage will be rejected .
      If the broadcast is SD the setup is added by the station.

      But I you get the technical spec doc from the station you know what they want.
      Steve

      Get Support or the Latest version of EDIUS:
      EDIUS support and Downloads

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      • #18
        Alot of great information here. Thank you.


        Where can I learn how to read and adjust vectorscopes? I was playing with it yesterday and couldnt do much of anything. Playing with the sliders didnt change the picture.


        Thanks,
        Chris
        Proud user of EDIUS!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by baddgsx View Post
          Alot of great information here. Thank you.


          Where can I learn how to read and adjust vectorscopes? I was playing with it yesterday and couldnt do much of anything. Playing with the sliders didnt change the picture.


          Thanks,
          Chris
          In order to see the Edius waveform vector scope really work, I would suggest that you load one of the Color Bar Clips from Edius. Right mouse click in an open area of your video clip Bin to display a drop-down menu exposing the options. Next, roll over the New Clip text to show another drop-down menu and select Color Bars. Guess what, you get another menu. Yes, there are lots of different version of color bars to work with, but ease of show simply select SMPTE Color Bars. Now place the clip of bars in your timeline, open the waveform/vector scope and drag you timeline scrup bar across the bar clip. For the vector scope select the 'line" option under the scope and you will see that each color hits in a perfect center of their appointed boxes. On the waveform display select "IRE". Now you will see the bright white of the bars desplayed at 100% ire and the black displayed at "0" ire. So that was a quick look and the scopes in function. Now for fun, scrub across some of your normal video. You will see the value of vectors scopes are somewhat lost. However you can see the brightest and darkest levels of your video on the waveform monitor. When you add a color correction and adjust your contrast your adversly change your bright. When you adjust you bright you adversly change you contract. The key is to understand the scopes enough to correctly make adjustments without distroying your content.

          To cover the simple concepts of waveform and vector scope, the best way would be to find a friendly video engineer or qualified video repair fellow. The repair guy needs to be someone who works in Broadcast TV and not the local TV repair guy. Rarely will you find a local TV repair guy use color bars to set anything up, but more just to simply get the TV on again.

          If they can display Color Bars on a waveform/vector scope one time for you, then you will quickly understand the information of black being (now) "0" and levels (white) being "100". This will help you a lot when trying to improve video content and expecially when you try and match mutiple mismatched cameras shooting the same program.

          The vector scopt pretty much goes out the window unless the video you are working with/capturing has color bars recorded to the tape or as a digital file. Even then, there are cameras that make the bars from a digital file that is not correct.

          I you can at least see Color Bars on a waveform monitor and then learn how to use the color filters within Edius to adjust your video on the waveform monitor through Edius, then you will have come a long way to producing a better video product from that point forward.

          When it comes to adjusting the color within your video, having a monitor that is adjusted to true color bars will be a true blessing. Once the monitor is adjusted to good bars, then don't touch the knobs, buttons, remote or screws again. (well don't touch untill you need to validate you correct bars again) You need to know what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) and working that way will give you peace of mind across TV Land.

          Hope this helps,
          Chuck

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          • #20
            thanks buddy ,

            I going to try this , this weekend.
            Proud user of EDIUS!

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