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Edius on a 64 bit windows machine?

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  • Frederick Joswick
    replied
    Thanks for the driver link StormDave!

    You guys rock and thanks for all your feedback. I picked up a couple copies of XP64bit and will do some testing of my own.

    Blessings to you all,
    Frederick

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Truly
    replied
    Edius software-only works on x64 and I did not install any special dongle drivers.

    But I have not tested Edius extensively in this configuration as my main Edius workstation XP32 is what I use most often.

    Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • STORMDAVE
    replied
    Originally posted by SONYMAN View Post
    So does anyone could reply me, does Edius (soft only) could work on Win XP 64bit? How about USB dongle? because there is no 64bit USB driver
    There seems to be drivers for them.

    http://alladinsys.com/support/hasp.aspx

    Make sure to pick from "End Users"...I forgot if the Edius dongle was Hasp4 or Hasp HL.

    Leave a comment:


  • SONYMAN
    replied
    So does anyone could reply me, does Edius (soft only) could work on Win XP 64bit? How about USB dongle? because there is no 64bit USB driver

    Leave a comment:


  • shueardm
    replied
    If you jump over to sonymediasoftware.com you will find information about the release of 64 bit version of Vegas near the end of the year.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    Ahh, I see what you're saying...

    Here's a grenade to throw at folks who're considering 64-bit Windows without a good reason:

    64-bit Windows does not support 16-bit applications! Yes, you read it right. That means you can't run a great many DOS utilities (my fav being PKZipFix).

    Leave a comment:


  • STORMDAVE
    replied
    Originally posted by GrassValley_BH View Post
    64-bit Windows runs both 32-bit and 64-bit apps just fine. The problem is more that the hardware scenario is uncontrolled (billions of possible hardware configs as opposed to Apple's fixed configurations) so the drivers are few and far between... that's the trade-off I guess.

    As for using cores, you know where I stand on that. It's going to take some radical changes in thinking and some good innovations to utilize more slower cores, rather than fewer faster cores for video. The problem is more the motion than the frames themselves. If video was truly a series of still frames and we didn't have the motion perception aspect, it'd be much easier (essentially it could do the same as Photoshop and slice the image into as many pieces as necessary).
    Yeah but there are dozens of versions of Windows, instead of just one which does both 64bit and 32bit. And the pricing is different.

    For cores, I was thinking that each 10 frames of video can be used for each core, etc. There are many ways to look into this, as I am no programmer, I was just showing the way other apps work :D

    Also I'm not sure how FCP works, and even if it uses more than 2 cores. I know during rendering it does it, but not playback. Haven't experimented much with FCP (Other than a few jobs), I just use Soundtrack a bit of Motion and DVD Studio Pro.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    64-bit Windows runs both 32-bit and 64-bit apps just fine. The problem is more that the hardware scenario is uncontrolled (billions of possible hardware configs as opposed to Apple's fixed configurations) so the drivers are few and far between... that's the trade-off I guess.

    As for using cores, you know where I stand on that. It's going to take some radical changes in thinking and some good innovations to utilize more slower cores, rather than fewer faster cores for video. The problem is more the motion than the frames themselves. If video was truly a series of still frames and we didn't have the motion perception aspect, it'd be much easier (essentially it could do the same as Photoshop and slice the image into as many pieces as necessary).

    Leave a comment:


  • STORMDAVE
    replied
    Right now under OSX Tiger After Effects CS3 adresses 8GB of RAM for me, by starting different threads in the background during rendering and preview. OSX Leopard is going to be completely 64bit, so both 32bit and 64bit apps can run together at the same time without problems! I just wish MS would do this, but obviously it's harder for them because of broader hardware support. What I'm trying to show with the above example is how CS3 (which I don't think is 64bit?) uses a workaround to make it work. Each thread eats about 1GB, so a total of 7 threads are adressed, so 7 cores are in use (1 is left for the main app and OS).

    Edius doesn't need to be 64bit, but it needs to use all available cores, even when it shows it during bootup. A video editing application doesn't really need more than 2GB of RAM, unless you have high res photos on the timeline and it's loaded into memory.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    Since EDIUS isn't 64-bit-optimized, the only RAM benefit you'd get from running 64-bit Windows is in the fact that you'd be able to have more applications open while still using their maximum/optimal RAM usage, because 64-bit Windows allows for more RAM in general.

    For example, in 32-bit Windows with 2 GB, you might have
    EDIUS 1 GB
    Photoshop 1 GB
    0 GB free

    Whereas in 64-bit Windows with 6 GB, you might have
    EDIUS 2 GB
    Photoshop 2 GB (maybe PS is 64-bit addressed? I don't know for sure)
    2 GB free

    Leave a comment:


  • skier-hughes
    replied
    To clarify my post, I was using it with the edius nx card.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frederick Joswick
    replied
    Good stuff

    Aloha fellas,

    One of the reason I actually wanted to know was because I wanted to take advantage of the memory (ram) benefits. So thank you Stormdave for your reasons.

    Thanks Aristotelis for your feedback as well good stuff.

    I think I'm gonna give it a try.

    Thanks,
    Frederick Joswick

    Leave a comment:


  • Aristotelis
    replied
    I have been working with Edius v4 (software only) in a 64bit XP system...It was working as good as in the 32bit Windows...I can't say that it was better...Never managed to use more than 2GB of memory while editing...

    Leave a comment:


  • STORMDAVE
    replied
    IMO the biggest advantage to 64bit processing is better memory managment per application

    Leave a comment:


  • GrassValley_BH
    replied
    EDIUS itself (the software) should work on 64-bit Windows, but it is not supported.

    EDIUS hardware, on the other hand, does not have 64-bit drivers, so it won't work in 64-bit Windows.

    To be honest, there aren't a lot of reasons why normal users need to move to 64-bit Windows at this stage. Not enough support exists yet on all fronts.

    I run XP 64-bit at home and I ended up installing a 32-bit XP virtual machine in order to get some normal day-to-day stuff working... like printing to PDF...

    Leave a comment:

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