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Color correcting using component out of video card

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  • #16
    Originally posted by peterC View Post
    If you go S/composite or RGB/component to a computer LCD monitor 1900 x 1200 say, what are you seeing? True YUV or an RGB / progressive interpolation? .... I can only see hi-res computer monitors as an answer, but progressive vs interlaced n YUV vs RGB has got me stumped.
    I'm glad you asked this because I think I've exceeded my question quota for a while. I've got a Dell 24" coming that will display 1900 x 1200, and I ordered it not being sure about the answers to the questions you have asked. A good while ago I asked, "just what is an NTSC monitor," since that is what i need to do accurate color correcting. I never could fully understand the answers that I got because of the issues you have raised.
    Harris
    edius pro 8.2, win10 pro x64, i7 5930K @ 4.4 on asus X99-A usb3.1, corsair h100i gtx with noctua fans, 32G gskill ddr4, gtx 980 4G, system 256G samsung ssd 950 pro M.2, swap 128G samsung ssd 850 pro, general use 512G samsung ssd 850 pro, video 4 @ 3T WD red pro in raid 5

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    • #17
      LCD monitors are inherently RGB.
      Then again, so are CRTs, just the light is emitted differently.

      However, LCD monitors are digital, so each pixel exists as discrete unit, whereas in a CRT, it's a matter of scanning, plus the digital nature of LCD affects the light level output in a different way.

      Furthermore, CRTs can do interlaced scanning. LCDs don't.

      As far as color goes, because of the analog nature of CRT as well as its phosphor nature, personally I find it more accurate compared to LCD.

      However, there's a good argument that the great majority of HD viewers are watching plasma, DLP or LCD, not a CRT-based HD set.

      A properly calibrated LCD can serve as a reasonably accurate reference, especially if it's designed for video.

      Just be aware that you should still "stick to the rules" regarding broadcast-safe colors and such. LCDs tend to be far more forgiving than CRTs, so just because it plays OK on an LCD doesn't mean it won't bloom, smear or roll on a CRT.

      Granted, the technology has advanced to a large degree, so the argument is much like analog audio recordings vs digital audio recordings. There are folks on both sides saying one is better than the other.

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      • #18
        OK, I lied, one more attempt to summarize

        Originally posted by GrassValley_BH View Post
        LCD monitors are inherently RGB.
        Then again, so are CRTs, just the light is emitted differently.
        so we've never been able to "see" YUV - every display device (CRT, LCD, DLP, plasma) that accepts a YUV signal must have in the display device itself a circuit to convert the YUV to RGB

        the question has always been, and remains, "how accurate/true is the YUV signal when it hits the RGB converter in the display device?"
        Harris
        edius pro 8.2, win10 pro x64, i7 5930K @ 4.4 on asus X99-A usb3.1, corsair h100i gtx with noctua fans, 32G gskill ddr4, gtx 980 4G, system 256G samsung ssd 950 pro M.2, swap 128G samsung ssd 850 pro, general use 512G samsung ssd 850 pro, video 4 @ 3T WD red pro in raid 5

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        • #19
          Originally posted by T-Bone View Post
          the question has always been, and remains, "how accurate/true is the YUV signal when it hits the RGB converter in the display device?"
          Herein lies the mystery...

          You take the same signal and feed it to two different TVs.
          As anyone who's shopped for TVs knows, the two will look different.

          Now, take the same siganl and feed it to two different broadcast CRTs.
          The phosphors and response on broadcast CRTs is calibrated for a set reference.
          The two displays should look the same, barring miscalibration, burn-in and the like.

          Now, we move to LCD/DLP/plasma...
          Again, we take the same signal and feed it to two different LCD/DLP/plasma.
          Unless they've been calibrated, they'll look different yet again.

          So, at the end of the day we really end up producing a signal that should look correct on the "baseline" display, but we have no idea what it's really going to look like to the end-viewer, except to trust that it will be reasonably close, as long as the end-viewer's display doesn't skew the image one way or another.

          Don't get me started on the "modes" TVs have nowadays - Sports, Cinema, etc.

          I calibrated my projector using a light meter and spreadsheet that measures the light output of the project. Essentially it aims for an even range of RGB output (granted,majority of luma is in green, but still).

          Color calibration is a pain. But the key is that everyone has the same reference.

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          • #20
            U have the option of LCD Computer monitor or LCD TV.

            Some LCD computer monitors have S/composite in for eg - 'tailored' for video...... (+ other Ins).

            What is your take on the 'difference' between choosing an LCD TV to monitor vs an LCD computer monitor to use as reference monitor?

            Seems to me there is none, bar some LCD's are better with reference to resolution definition and colour rendition than others. So, that being the case, choose best unit either Computer or TV LCD that u think best suits your situation.
            That about it?
            peterC
            ---------------------
            Edius 3 v3.62 beta / DVRexRT cards
            (Please don't throw stones, it works!)
            Edius 9 v3

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            • #21
              Originally posted by peterC View Post
              U have the option of LCD Computer monitor or LCD TV.

              Some LCD computer monitors have S/composite in for eg - 'tailored' for video...... (+ other Ins).

              What is your take on the 'difference' between choosing an LCD TV to monitor vs an LCD computer monitor to use as reference monitor?

              Seems to me there is none, bar some LCD's are better with reference to resolution definition and colour rendition than others. So, that being the case, choose best unit either Computer or TV LCD that u think best suits your situation.
              That about it?

              Hi Peter. Whether you go for computer monitor or TV, if it's for video monitoring then check the response time too as slower units tend to show video smearing. Downside of most faster units (around 5ms) is that they use 6 bits per pixel instead of 8 so they don't have the same colour depth.

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              • #22
                Yes thanks for that J'Sing.

                Not a lot said about this in var specs I've looked at except for the Eizo S2410W which uses 14bit apparently, but a little costly at A$2420 24'' and also a little old. 8ms RP, but top of the pile all over especially colour repo. Another is Samsung 242MP (legacy now to 244T) @ 1920x1680 A$2800 24''. This unit was best I've seen going so far - very impressive but dear.

                For 'colour correcting' (post exposure mgt use too) and associated 'colour mgt' eg graphics creation and visual SFX/ colour treatments etc it's a tough one to know the best choice vs cost for WYSIWYG and 'tech spec compliance'.

                Others: BenQ FP241W - best wrap after the Eizo on one 'read' then as original poster T bone says, inclined to the Dell 2407WP 24''.

                Any users with 1st hands?........
                peterC
                ---------------------
                Edius 3 v3.62 beta / DVRexRT cards
                (Please don't throw stones, it works!)
                Edius 9 v3

                Comment


                • #23
                  [whoops, did not see there were posts after this one]
                  Originally posted by peterC View Post
                  What is your take on the 'difference' between choosing an LCD TV to monitor vs an LCD computer monitor to use as reference monitor?

                  Seems to me there is none, bar some LCD's are better with reference to resolution definition and colour rendition than others. So, that being the case, choose best unit either Computer or TV LCD that u think best suits your situation.
                  I know you're asking Brandon, but your conclusion must be correct, now that we've established that an LCD is progessive RGB even if it's in an LCD TV - an LCD does not become interlaced just because it's in a TV

                  with the same inputs and outputs, the only difference between a computer LCD and an LCD TV is that the latter includes a TV tuner, so if you don't need the tuner, you do as you say
                  Harris
                  edius pro 8.2, win10 pro x64, i7 5930K @ 4.4 on asus X99-A usb3.1, corsair h100i gtx with noctua fans, 32G gskill ddr4, gtx 980 4G, system 256G samsung ssd 950 pro M.2, swap 128G samsung ssd 850 pro, general use 512G samsung ssd 850 pro, video 4 @ 3T WD red pro in raid 5

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